Author Topic: Case Finds  (Read 2704 times)

Offline bbrandha

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Re: Case Finds
« Reply #15 on: September 06, 2016, 12:30:06 PM »
It was just a case that I bought as one of a lot.

Offline andybeals

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Re: Case Finds
« Reply #16 on: September 06, 2016, 01:04:55 PM »
This might be useful;- 1958 Conn woodwind instrument care instructions.  :)

And note that the old Conn literature tells us that a clarinet is no longer worth playing after a short period of time.  However, I can't find the reference anymore.  It was on saxophone.org in their "Museum" section and listed expected intervals between repadding and also total lifespan.  Can't find it now.  Drat.  I'm sure we're all familiar with the term "Blown Out".   ;D


LeBlanc care instructions:

http://johnstonbaughs.com/files/av1126_leblanc_wood_clar_warr.pdf

The Clarinet Pages is where we answer the question: "Am I not a Clarinet and a Woodwind?"

Offline Windsong

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Re: Case Finds
« Reply #17 on: September 06, 2016, 01:58:11 PM »
Wolf Tones, eh?
I learn something new every day...
Thanks for that.
The Clarinet Pages forum court jester, and expert bubblegum welder.

Offline Silversorcerer

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Re: Case Finds
« Reply #18 on: September 06, 2016, 05:23:59 PM »
-None of mine are worth playing after a couple of hours.
- Silversorcerer (David Powell) exclusively for Phil's original “The Clarinet Pages" forum

Offline Windsong

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Re: Case Finds
« Reply #19 on: September 06, 2016, 09:31:59 PM »
"Inherant in the systems of some persons..." 
Wow.  So some people are especially acidic?  I've met a number of folks who are acidic in temperament, but had not considered that people have radically different PH balances, but I suppose they do.
Could this warranty be considered PH discriminatory?
 ;)


This might be useful;- 1958 Conn woodwind instrument care instructions.  :)

And note that the old Conn literature tells us that a clarinet is no longer worth playing after a short period of time.  However, I can't find the reference anymore.  It was on saxophone.org in their "Museum" section and listed expected intervals between repadding and also total lifespan.  Can't find it now.  Drat.  I'm sure we're all familiar with the term "Blown Out".   ;D


LeBlanc care instructions:

http://johnstonbaughs.com/files/av1126_leblanc_wood_clar_warr.pdf
The Clarinet Pages forum court jester, and expert bubblegum welder.

Offline Silversorcerer

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Re: Case Finds
« Reply #20 on: September 07, 2016, 07:25:25 AM »
Most wood is slightly acidic. Human body chemistry is largely a function of what you eat and drink and most people can alter it by paying attention to diet. If you drink a lot of sodas and eat a bunch of junk food, you will be acidic. If you eat mostly fresh fruits and good vegetables, you will be less acidic. One thing that helps is to run a lot of clean water through your system. People think I am a bit eccentric, but all of my water, even the coffee I am drinking right now;- is rain water collected from my polycarbonate roof. Synthetics have their place, you see.  :) Polycarbonate roof, PVC gutters, food grade plastic storage barrels, nylon fabric debris filters, etc. That water starts the filtration process never having hit the ground, which means most of the junk in the tap water can't be in it in the first place. The sky harbors some pollution, but it is washed to the ground in the first few minutes of a good rain storm. That part of the rain, you bypass when collecting rain. That late part of the storm is the cleanest but all of it is cleaner than water that has hit the ground. But I digress. Water that has a bunch of junk in it already (dissolved junk you can't see) doesn't have near as much room for the junk you want to wash out of your system, which is largely acidic metabolites.

Wood is not a human. Almost all trees, particularly deciduous hardwoods, prefer acidic soils. The pine trees perform the function of acidifying the soil (with needles) so that the hardwoods can get a toe hold. Caustic bases like baking soda and soaps are more damaging to woods than weak acids. If I use soap on a wooden instrument I follow it with a very weak vinegar solution to knock the pH back toward the acidic side. Stronger acids will burn the wood. What is necessary is a buffer acid. The best strategy is to keep water soluble salts away from the wood and perspiration is one way a human gets rid of excess salts. If you don't take in excess salts, there is not so much to excrete.

The idea that there is a great deal of saliva going down the barrel of a horn is a bit over-blown. It varies greatly according to the player. I tend to play with dry lips or slightly moistened lips. What goes down the barrel in every case is mostly condensation and that is mostly water because salts do not evaporate to any large degree. The best practice is to practice not spitting into your horn and keep it sufficiently oiled. Salts are not soluble in oils. Salts are soluble in water. Keep the wood oiled and it is protected from the most corrosive salts. There is not much in your saliva that will attack wood very quickly either. Otherwise we could eat and digest wood. The only critters that have the digestive juices for that job are termites, so just don't let termites play your wooden clarinet and it should last a long time.  :)

- Silversorcerer (David Powell) exclusively for Phil's original “The Clarinet Pages" forum

Offline Windsong

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Re: Case Finds
« Reply #21 on: September 07, 2016, 03:52:00 PM »
I tend to think I am probably not overly acidic, then.
I can't tell you the last time I had a soda, and seldom eat prepared foods.  I never add salt to anything, and I don't have a sweet tooth.
I do not collect my own rainwater, but I do drink a lot of filtered water.  You have to where I live, as our water is questionable, at best (not like Flint's, but certainly not good) and detrimental at worst.
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Offline andybeals

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Re: Case Finds
« Reply #22 on: September 07, 2016, 08:06:10 PM »
In a past life, I had a water distiller.  It was great.  The city water isn't too bad here - it's on a par (although a little less chlorinated) than the water I grew up with in DC. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qr2bSL5VQgM
The Clarinet Pages is where we answer the question: "Am I not a Clarinet and a Woodwind?"

Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Case Finds
« Reply #23 on: September 07, 2016, 11:44:14 PM »
In a past life, I had a water distiller.  It was great.  The city water isn't too bad here - it's on a par (although a little less chlorinated) than the water I grew up with in DC. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qr2bSL5VQgM
I'm actually an amphibian so I just absorb my water from the air :)
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages

Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Case Finds
« Reply #24 on: January 28, 2019, 04:13:51 PM »
I didn’t expect to find the Audion Organ Key Selector Method inside a Normandy case...
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages