Author Topic: Bore oil vs. Key oil  (Read 1021 times)

Offline noneyet

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Bore oil vs. Key oil
« on: September 19, 2017, 10:20:21 AM »
Has anyone here accidentally used key oil when they thought they were using bore oil? Asking for a friend... :o
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Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Bore oil vs. Key oil
« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2017, 10:23:06 AM »
Probably not a big deal, really. Bore oil should work for keys but not as well, perhaps.
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages

Offline noneyet

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Re: Bore oil vs. Key oil
« Reply #2 on: September 19, 2017, 12:02:06 PM »
Well i just lubed the bore with key oil  :-[
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Offline Silversorcerer

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Re: Bore oil vs. Key oil
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2017, 12:27:08 PM »
It's not too tragic. Key oil frequently gets onto the wood. Get the Hetman key oil with the needle top and you probably won't get it mixed up.
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Offline noneyet

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Re: Bore oil vs. Key oil
« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2017, 02:39:17 PM »
I was using C.G. Conn key oil.
With a needle tip.

Before having my coffee, obviously....

Just not having a banner day  >:(
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Offline TMHeimer

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Re: Bore oil vs. Key oil
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2020, 08:01:37 PM »
I agree about key oil getting on the bore a bit. I have probably mixed the two up a time or two over the decades. Someone once said all that the bore/key/valve/slide oil stuff may all be the same with different labels on the bottles.
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Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Bore oil vs. Key oil
« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2020, 11:05:16 PM »
I wouldn’t be surprised. As far as I’m concerned, as long as it’s oil that absorbs into the wood, works for me.

Heck, if you’re having a salad and got some extra olive oil then by all means

I personally use exclusively Thyme oil. It has powerful antifungal, antibacterial, and most importantly antiVIRAL properties. Plus, I enjoy the smell a lot. It’s prerty potent so lubing the clarinet with thyme will also disinfect the case by extension.
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages

Offline LarryS

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Re: Bore oil vs. Key oil
« Reply #7 on: April 08, 2020, 08:43:04 AM »
Can I ask, what can I use as key oil if I have none. My clarinet is plastic so bore oil isn't needed.
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Offline kewald

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Re: Bore oil vs. Key oil
« Reply #8 on: May 05, 2020, 10:38:44 AM »
I'm an old man who is new to working on clarinets.  I bought a small bottle of key oil in medium viscosity from one of the repair sites online - don't recall which one.  Anyway - if I understand the process correctly, one should never just apply oil to the joints between the posts and hinges, but should remove the key, clean the rod/pivots and hinge tube and then re-oil sparingly.  It seems that oiling the joint may cause a buildup of dust, etc. and cause the key to eventually become sluggish.

Comments, please.

Ken
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Rank beginner at Clarinet and Alto Sax

Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Bore oil vs. Key oil
« Reply #9 on: May 05, 2020, 01:22:59 PM »
Ken,

I would only oil a key if there's a real reason to do so. Ie, if there's noticeable stickiness or sluggishness. If it's working just fine then there's probably no real reason to oil it.

However, one of the mail reasons for keys to get stuck in the first place is due to decades of oil accumulation.

When I have to, I:
1. Remove the key and the rod
2. Wipe the rod off with a piece of paper
3. Insert the rod in and out of the key several times
4. Wipe rod off again
5. Reattach key and apply a bit of oil to the rod

Too much oil gets everywhere, so I like to err on the lesser side.
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages

Offline TMHeimer

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Re: Bore oil vs. Key oil
« Reply #10 on: May 05, 2020, 05:46:43 PM »
I'm an old man who is new to working on clarinets.  I bought a small bottle of key oil in medium viscosity from one of the repair sites online - don't recall which one.  Anyway - if I understand the process correctly, one should never just apply oil to the joints between the posts and hinges, but should remove the key, clean the rod/pivots and hinge tube and then re-oil sparingly.  It seems that oiling the joint may cause a buildup of dust, etc. and cause the key to eventually become sluggish.

Comments, please.

Ken
I have oiled keys every 6 months for decades on numerous clarinets, but never removed keys to do so. 8 of my 10 clarinets don't work now, but because of reasons other than sluggishness (busted springs, keys out of line, etc.). But, maybe only oiling twice yearly doesn't cause enough build up of dust to make a difference?
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Offline windydankoff

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Re: Bore oil vs. Key oil
« Reply #11 on: May 06, 2020, 09:34:38 AM »
It's a machine. It needs oil. Letting it go dry and waiting for a "squeaky wheel" is inviting a performance failure, rust, wear and screws getting stuck. If old oil gets gummy, it's because it is old-fashioned oil that is very old. It can be loosened with a solvent or very light oil. Often it will stay reliable after that, if you don't want to disassemble it. (If you do, clean the tube with a pipe cleaner.)

The best key oil is synthetic, because it never breaks down or gums up. Cheap commercial "key oil" is an unknown entity. There is a website (now lost to me) of a very high-end instrument technician who says he uses motor oil! I presume synthetic oil. I was gratified to read that because that's what I've been using for the past 15 years on many instruments including flutes with light action. I've never had any key get sluggish. I use a pinpoint oiler that I got from Amazon or eBay (the squeeze bottle type, not the push-pen type). I fill it every few years from the remains of a drained-out Mobile One bottle. It has just the right consistency, medium-heavy, so it stays in place for years. It only runs out of the joint if I apply too much. I've had pleasing results on keys of perfect fit and of sloppy fit. If it soaks into wood, it's of no consequence.

Annual oiling is sufficient for an instrument that is used regularly. There is absolutely NO need to disassemble key work for routine oiling! Just place a pinpoint drop at each rod end. Hit the key a couple times, and it will soak in. After a few minutes, you can wipe with a Q tip if you wish, to eliminate residual oil. Oiling annually is a good way routine as you inspect and clean your instrument. It will love you in return.

Here's a suggestion:  Remove your register key. It's easy for anyone to do. Wipe the rod on a tissue to see if it's oily or dry. AND while you're at it, clean your register tube (stem). It's critical that it be clear of debris. Use a pipe cleaner with alcohol. Now you have a sampling of the condition of your key lube, and if there was any debris, you will be thrilled by an improved Bb tone.
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Offline Dibbs

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Re: Bore oil vs. Key oil
« Reply #12 on: May 06, 2020, 10:18:56 AM »
Perhaps this is the article you read

http://www.shwoodwind.co.uk/HandyHints/oilaction.htm

Offline windydankoff

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Re: Bore oil vs. Key oil
« Reply #13 on: May 06, 2020, 02:50:41 PM »
Thanks Dibbs, that's MY new lubrication bible!

The same site also shows a great clarinet repair book that I've found enlightening:
http://www.shwoodwind.co.uk/Haynes/clarinet/Haynes_clarinet_manual.htm
Windy  ~  BLACK • HOLE Clarinets
C CLARINETS & Pruefer Silver Throat
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Thanks to The Clarinet Pages

Offline LarryS

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Re: Bore oil vs. Key oil
« Reply #14 on: May 11, 2020, 03:42:19 PM »
Re key oil. Is it safe to use sewing machine/hair clipper oil on clarinet keys?
You don't stop playing when you get old, you get old when you stop playing.
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