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Author Topic: Replacing pads and corks  (Read 130 times)

Offline Killeyj1976

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Replacing pads and corks
« on: September 20, 2018, 03:41:38 PM »
I have a 1960s Reynolds clarinet, appears to be a stencil of a Bundy.  The tenon corks aren't falling off yet, but have seen better days.  It's been probably 25 years or so since it was corked/padded.   

I've heard stories about how having it corked and padded will run me about $200/$300 bucks.  Not wanting to spend that, and I'm brave enough to try it if I can.   Question is, what's involved in this, and is it that difficult?   What kind of time is involved in it?  Found a kit on eBay for about $30. 

Any input appreciated!

Thanks!

Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Replacing pads and corks
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2018, 05:16:39 PM »
Itís not too hard, but takes plenty of trial and error to get things right.

Also, unless you have an electric belt sander of some kind, then hand-sanding corks to fit takes literally forever. Itís my least favorite part of a resto; I knock 5% off the cost for each cork I DONT replace because itís just so tedious.

If you have free time and want to pick up a new hobby, Iíd say go for it.

Eventually you end up collecting a whole bunch of tools, but you can start with just a small screwdriver and some adhesive.
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages

Offline Killeyj1976

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Re: Replacing pads and corks
« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2018, 05:34:38 PM »
Would a dremel type tool with the sanding drum work on the corks?  Is taking the keys and all that off that bad?  Or is it more a matter of just keeping track of all the little pieces?

Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Replacing pads and corks
« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2018, 09:29:04 PM »
That should work, although I've never done it. The extra control you have by hand-sanding is good, but it just takes so dang long. Definitely worth a shot, though.

As for the keys, it's pretty simple. Just unscrew the screw and take the key off. Take pictures or label which screw/rod goes with which keys, as if you get them mixed up it's annoying to un-mix.
Also, have somewhere safe to put the screws/rods. If you lose one, it's often game over unless you can find a replacement with the exact thread.

There are no complicated linkages in your standard clarinet, so putting it all back together isn't that hard. Taking pictures after every key removal is helpful. Or, you can treat it as a jigsaw puzzle if you're into that.

It's overall a relatively simple process. Seating the pads is another story, though. If they don't seat exactly right over the tone hole, then the whole thing won't work.
I would invest in a "leak light." I use a very cheap, battery powered LED string light ($4 from Amazon or eBay). The string is flexible and narrow enough to get right in behind the pad and detect gaps.

You can also detect leaks without a light, but it's a bit tougher. Generally this requires use of a very thin piece of fish bladder (or similar material) wrapped around a stick, which you then slide under the pads and manually test how much resistance the bladder gets when its pulled out.
I wouldn't recommend this technique; just shell out the $4 for the light and make your life a LOT easier.
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages

Offline Dibbs

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Re: Replacing pads and corks
« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2018, 04:38:48 AM »
I've never used a leak light on a clarinet.  I've been advised against it on more than one occasion.  A cigarette paper used a feeler gauge works for me.

Here's an article about leak checking on Stephen Howard's site.

http://www.shwoodwind.co.uk/HandyHints/LeakyPads.htm

His Haynes clarinet manual is very good too.




Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Replacing pads and corks
« Reply #5 on: September 21, 2018, 09:40:44 AM »
Why have you been advised against it?
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages

Offline Killeyj1976

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Re: Replacing pads and corks
« Reply #6 on: September 21, 2018, 11:40:38 AM »
Nice.  I figured I'd do one end at a time.  Less loose parts that way.  Obviously being careful to not overtighten things.   Do he pads come off easily?   Or is using a small "exacto knife" make it easier?  I'd like to get some new keys that are higher quality, but I'm guessing that's not really going to be in my budget.  Any specific kit to buy as far as pads and corks go?  Or would one of the "universal" kits I see on eBay work?Thanks for your input!

Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Replacing pads and corks
« Reply #7 on: September 21, 2018, 12:31:03 PM »
You usually want to heat up the pad cups with a lighter to melt and loosen the adhesive. You can try to pry them off, but often times this will end up in half of the pad breaking off and staying stuck in the pad cup.

Getting new keys is extremely tough. You would have to obtain a second clarinet of the exact same brand and year, and even then thereís no guarantee the keys would fit.
I had two clarinets that were just a few thousand numbers apart, but they keys didnnot fit at all.

If youíre lucky, a universal set of pads will work. But more likely than not, it wonít. So, I would measure each pad cup with a micrometer and get exact sizes to fit.
Almost any cork will work. They are usually too wide to fit, but itís expected to cut the cork pieces to fit.
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages

Offline Killeyj1976

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Re: Replacing pads and corks
« Reply #8 on: September 21, 2018, 04:45:55 PM »
It's for a Reynolds clarinet, which i was told looks very much like an older Bundy (guessing the Bundy pads would fit?) Not sure exactly when it was made other than 1960s.  Will probably look a bit more, but not holding my breath on that one.

Offline Dibbs

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Re: Replacing pads and corks
« Reply #9 on: September 24, 2018, 04:39:50 AM »
Why have you been advised against it?

Clarinet toneholes are longer and narrower than flute or saxophone.  Possibly not enough room for the light to get out unless you can get an LED right up into the tone hole.

Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Replacing pads and corks
« Reply #10 on: September 24, 2018, 09:19:36 AM »
I noticed that when I had a different type of light.

Nowadays I use an LED string made of wire and LED; that way I can bend the light every which way and get it right up into the tone hole. Turn off the lights and no leaks can escape the might of the light.
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages

Offline mechanic

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Re: Replacing pads and corks
« Reply #11 on: September 24, 2018, 04:26:01 PM »
Has anyone tried the Norbeck pads from Ferrees?  Cork backed silicone, shouldnít be as squishy as
Valentinos get, and at $0.70, a third of the price.


As far as leak light versus feeler, I use feelers when setting the pad, and a leak light to search for the well hidden leaks.
For Phil's  " The Clarinet Pages " forum, where knowledge is freely shared.  clarinetpages.info  clarinetpages.net

Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Replacing pads and corks
« Reply #12 on: September 24, 2018, 05:27:33 PM »
Has anyone tried the Norbeck pads from Ferrees?  Cork backed silicone, shouldnít be as squishy as
Valentinos get, and at $0.70, a third of the price.


As far as leak light versus feeler, I use feelers when setting the pad, and a leak light to search for the well hidden leaks.
Never have heard of those, but definitely worth a shot. Those are about double the price I get my leather pads at wholesale, but might be better and worth the price.
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages

Offline shmuelyosef

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Re: Replacing pads and corks
« Reply #13 on: September 26, 2018, 04:32:40 PM »
Also, unless you have an electric belt sander of some kind, then hand-sanding corks to fit takes literally forever. It’s my least favorite part of a resto; I knock 5% off the cost for each cork I DONT replace because it’s just so tedious.
I do lots of clarinet overhauls, and I completely don't understand this comment. What corks are you hand-sanding? Are you talking about MAKING pads? Even on tenon corks, if I use the right thickness cork, it takes 1-2 minutes to clean up the lap joint and size it. I use 220 wet-dry sandpaper...I back up whole sheets of it with 3M transparent packing tape and then slice 9" strips off to the correct width for the tenon. I pull it between my left thumb and the cork to sand about 1/4 of the tenon circumference each pass. I use these to fine tune regulation corks as well.
Regarding leak lights...they totally rock for flutes and saxophones, but I have not found them at all useful for clarinets as the toneholes are WAY too deep for meaningful light to come through. I used a feeler tool FROM VOTAW
« Last Edit: September 26, 2018, 04:54:47 PM by shmuelyosef »
Soprano: Yanagisawa (Yani) S990
Alto: Yani A880, A990, Yamaha YAS82ZS
Tenor: Yani T880, T992, Yamaha YTS82ZS
Baritone: Yani B991, Selmer Mk VI
Flute: Yamaha J40, Muramatsu EX
Clarinet: Selmer CT, Series 9
BC: Yamaha 221mkii
Piano: Mason & Hamlin Model A, Fender Rhodes Stage 73 Mk I, Nord Electro 6HP

Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Replacing pads and corks
« Reply #14 on: September 26, 2018, 05:23:46 PM »
Sounds like youíve got a better technique than I do. With 220 grit glued on a popsicle stick, it takes me 10 minutes to sand a cork down to fit.

Like Iíve mentioned before, LED string lights are little diodes on a a wire, thin enough to pass through even the smallest tone holes (except register key). The string allows the diode to be angled to literally touch the pad, ferreting out every possible leak source.
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages