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Author Topic: Identifying my clarinet  (Read 45 times)

Offline Karen

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Identifying my clarinet
« on: October 07, 2018, 03:02:46 AM »
I was directed here for help in identifying my clarinet to see if it's worth investing @$400+ to restore it. No marks on bell or mouthpiece. Cap is Martin (France). Body: each piece is stamped  Penzel Mueller & Co. New York. Upper piece stamped above keys with what looks like an eagle and an 8 above it. Lower piece stamped about an inch above where bell joint.  Only number found anywhere otherwise is 016 on back of one key
 

Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Identifying my clarinet
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2018, 12:21:09 PM »
Welcome to the forum!

Usually Penzel Mueller clarinets are not worth enough to make a $400 investment worth it.

If your clarinet has the Boehm key system, then it could sell for $250-$400.

If it has the Albert key system, then it would probably max out at $250 or so.

If you can attach pictures that would be helpful!
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages

Offline Windsong

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Re: Identifying my clarinet
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2018, 07:20:51 PM »
Perhaps the most important piece of information to ascertain from you is whether or not you are a player.  If you are a player, and want this clarinet put back into playable, enjoyable condition, $400.00 is a paltry fee to pay for an excellent PM.  If you do not play, and have no personal investment in this instrument, other than your initial cash outlay, sell it, unrestored.  Dave is correct that there will be very little meat left on the bone after such a restoration, on the common market--regardless its true, inherant value, if it's not done for you, personally.
The Clarinet Pages forum court jester, and expert bubblegum welder.

Offline Windsong

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Re: Identifying my clarinet
« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2018, 07:47:05 PM »
Perhaps the most important piece of information to ascertain from you is whether or not you are a player.  If you are a player, and want this clarinet put back into playable, enjoyable condition, $400.00 is a paltry fee to pay for an excellent PM.  If you do not play, and have no personal investment in this instrument, other than your initial cash outlay, sell it, unrestored.  Dave is correct that there will be very little meat left on the bone after such a restoration, on the common market--regardless its true, inherent value, if it's not done for you, personally.
The Clarinet Pages forum court jester, and expert bubblegum welder.

Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Identifying my clarinet
« Reply #4 on: October 11, 2018, 09:52:12 PM »
The vintage clarinet market suffers from what I call Popularity Syndrome.
The Big 4 manufacturers - Buffet, Selmer, Yamaha, and LeBlanc completely dominate the new and used clarinet market. By virtue of name alone, instruments of these four companies will ALWAYS sell for significantly more than equivalent or even superior competitors.

This means that a superb Penzel Mueller that may in fact play better than a contemporaneous pro Selmer model will sell for significantly less, each and every time.

This is great for serious players who want the best possible product at the best possible price, but terrible for individuals hoping to resell or make any real profit off of these "other" brands.
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages