Author Topic: Grumpy's Lafayette  (Read 66 times)

Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Grumpy's Lafayette
« on: June 24, 2020, 02:22:50 PM »
Hello all,

Attachments weren't working yesterday so Mr Grumpy sent me pics of his Lafayette clarinet. They are attached below.

I estimated this clarinet to be between 1860 and 1880. I feel like the "France" stamp is distinctive enough to ascribe to a manufacturer. Thibouville popped into my head, but I am not the expert here.

Please post with any thoughts on age, maker, value, and any opinions!

Dave, on behalf of Grumpy.
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Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Grumpy's Lafayette
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2020, 02:31:21 PM »
a few more
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Offline Airflyte

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Re: Grumpy's Lafayette
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2020, 06:47:20 PM »
Should be a nice "horn".

So with the simple system clarinets having the 2 rings on the lower joint (added by Adolphe Sax 1840 ish?) . . . does anyone know how long these were in vogue until the additional 2 rings on the upper joint appeared?

I think the Albert's were advancing very quickly once Iwan Müller's design was established.

« Last Edit: June 24, 2020, 06:48:58 PM by Airflyte »
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Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Grumpy's Lafayette
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2020, 07:28:40 PM »
Did you know that a place in India still manufactures this style, with no upper rings? The clarinets are absolute trash but technically, they're still made........
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Offline GrumpyMiddleAgedMan

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Re: Grumpy's Lafayette
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2020, 11:10:18 PM »
Thanks for the post up.
I Had ordered come CA to patch up the crack in the Lafayette so while waiting for it to arrive i was parsing the site.  I happened on the posts about using hide glue to basically mend the wood back together.  Now i have used super glue for many different things and have found it to be not so reliable.  I use it to glue back tile together when i break small pieces (and not so small pieces) at work.  Usually works out well if you get it placed right but is still fragile. 
What I like in reading about using the hide glue is that if you make a mistake or it does not bond well is that you get a redo being that it is water soluble.
Other than being neat and from what I am understanding from posts here, keeping the glue thin.  Are there any suggestions for application and saturation of the crack?
First picture is of the Lafayette with the crack.  It is not large but it does run into the tone hole so that is an area of concern obviously.  My other question is there is a mound of black 'stuff' above on the right.  I do not think that there is a crack underneath but I am not sure.  I would like to remove this mass but am not too sure as to what i should be using to get rid of it or if it might be a bad idea to do so.  Suggestions are welcome.
Next two pictures are of a PMP I have with a rather large crack in the upper joint and some missing wood in the bell.  My original plan was to drill and pin the crack after sealing with ca.... But if i can go with the hide glue to mend the crack i would rather do that.  I think less is more and i would hate to have to drill and fill, aesthetically i think a 'veil' at the worst from the hide glue would be more acceptable.  As for the bell, what are suggestions for filling in missing chunks of wood?  I do have what i am assuming is wood stock from work where they were using what i think was some sort of african black wood. It is about as hard as a rock and the carpenters were complaining about their tools dulling very fast while working with it.  Can i graft some of that onto the bell or would dust and glue be more preferable?
Sorry if this is too many questions but I kind of want to be sure of what I am doing as I don't really want to destroy something any further Than it already is.
Only happy mistakes here.