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Clarinet Roadshow => Make and Model lists and research => Topic started by: DaveLeBlanc on February 13, 2013, 06:37:38 PM

Title: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on February 13, 2013, 06:37:38 PM
Hello all, I hereby pronounce this thread to be the official Plateau Key thread!  Any and all information regarding plateaus are welcome.

I\'d like to share my first plateau Boehm clarinet, a Vito. (attached are pictures).

I think it hails from the 1980s, due to the case style; the Vito logo I believe also comes from this time period.

The clarinet has a problem that I also see on my plateau keyed alto clarinet: the middle A and B come out about only a half step apart.  The A comes out sharp, while the B comes out quite flat.  I suspect this to be an issue affecting plateau keyed clarinets of any kind.  It seems that the fact that the holes are plateau and not open accounts for this annoying tone issue.

Nevertheless, this clarinet will find several friends among my other plateau\'d clarinets: 2 mazzeos, 1 Bundy semi-plateau (http://www.clarinetpages.net/vintage-plastic-composite-clarinets/bundy/bundy-mazzeo), and 1 Brevetto Bottali simple system with plateau keys.
Title: RE: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: Hitman99 on February 14, 2013, 12:31:07 PM
Hello,

It looks a nice piece of kit!
I;m trying to Identify this and could do with some Expertise please?

Console
Plateau
Selmer?
Bit brown
CALTEAU mouthpiece.
Albert system?
Plays nice.
Title: RE: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on February 15, 2013, 03:45:44 PM
wow you have a nice find!  it looks to be made of hard rubber, due to the discoloration of the body.

the albert system dates it to the 1920s or before.

thats really all i can tell...
Title: RE: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on February 15, 2013, 03:46:49 PM
http://www.ebay.com/itm/251228904149?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1438.l2649

this links to the weirdest clarinet possible.
plateau keyed FULL boehm!!  and its in teh key of Ab, apparently.  i didnt even know keyof Ab existed!
Title: RE: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: Skyfacer on February 15, 2013, 07:15:26 PM
Could be an error. I\'ve heard of the Bb Clarinet being called a B , so perhaps this is the same type of error in reverse , the A being called an Ab.
However there is , or was an Ab Piccolo Clarinet , the smallest of the family that they even manage to fit the standard \'Boehm\' mechanism onto.
Another rare tonality that is rarely seen now is the Sopranino in D , half a tone lower than the Eb Sopranino.
Title: RE: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on June 27, 2013, 11:37:08 PM
here is the list of plateau keyed clarinet makers so far:

Boehm:
Pedler
Vito
D. Noblet (Leblanc - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JN4OX-yefbY&feature=endscreen&NR=1)
Normandy

Albert:
Console
Conn

Simple:
Lyon and Healy (information courtesy of the National Music Museum)
Brevetto Bottali
Title: RE: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on July 26, 2013, 04:07:04 PM
and add Selmer to the list...

here is a Series 9

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Selmer-Series-9-Clarinet-/141023486960?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item20d5a7a3f0

plateau keyed of course
Title: RE: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: gkern on July 29, 2013, 02:44:54 PM
Hey Dave - open the 2nd link in the first post; REALLY interesting clarinet! A plateau Albert!

http://test.woodwind.org/clarinet/BBoard/read.html?f=1&i=391482&t=391482
Title: RE: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on July 29, 2013, 04:54:03 PM
wow that\'s pretty awesome! especially with those awesome saxophone pearls!
Title: RE: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on July 29, 2013, 07:07:55 PM
Here is my version of putting saxophone pearls on a plateau clarinet (in this case, a Vito)
Title: RE: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: Airflyte on July 29, 2013, 07:26:16 PM
Quote from: \'DaveLeBlanc\' pid=\'1228\' dateline=\'1375150075\'

Here is my version of putting saxophone pearls on a plateau clarinet (in this case, a Vito)


I like it! Would this work on a Dazzler?
Title: RE: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on July 30, 2013, 01:12:06 PM
i was trying to figure out how to put pearls on an open hole clarinet and here\'s what i came up with.
1. get a pearl that is bigger than the ring
2. attach a pad to the bottom of the pearl
3. attach pearl to ring

this way, i THINK, when depressing the pearl, the pad on the bottom will seal the hole, as just a pearl wouldn\'t seal the hole well enough, it seems.

i\'ll keep you posted on my progress!
Title: RE: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on August 02, 2013, 06:53:24 PM
i tried that pearl on open hole clarinet idea on my Eb.  didn\'t work.  like i thought, the pearl doesnt create a good enough seal and so air leaks out and the instrument cannot be played.  

all you need to do is find a way to make a good seal and you\'re all set!

here\'s a picture of what i tried to do
Title: RE: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on August 31, 2013, 06:47:48 PM
http://www.ebay.com/itm/281158056345?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1438.l2649

I guess we have to add Buffet to the list
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: Silversorcerer on May 14, 2016, 12:18:08 AM
Bettoney Boston 3* Plateau   :)

I was going to give this one it's own thread but since there is an "official" plateau thread, this is where it belongs. And it is also a good way to compare the approach of different makers to the plateau concept to have them all in one thread.

I am surprised that this is the first Bettoney plateau clarinet to make it to this thread. Historically, I think their plateau beginner model came to market before other major USA makers offered them, but I could be wrong. In any case their execution of a plateau design is quite elegant and comparatively uncluttered. Bettoney makes use of key work concepts typically found on plateau Boehm flutes to keep extra rods and other clutter to a minimum. The lower joint mechanism is particularly interesting but somewhat more tedious to get into proper adjustment. Properly adjusted, it preserves all the functions of the three rings of the lower joint so that there is no change necessary in fingering strategies between this plateau model and a model with open rings. To do this, the plateau key cups cannot actuate each other, but all must actuate the B key cup as well as the bridge link. Bettoney worked this out in a particularly clever way but it took the space generally allocated to the side or cross B key, which became the other-side cross B key. This was done without adding another rod, lever, key post, or other clutter. Bettoney lets several existing mechanical paths perform double duty to reduce the necessary hardware.

The 3* also features (like all Bettoney clarinets I've seen) the patented Bettoney C# to Eb key linkage that allows an alternate forked fingering for Eb / Ab similar to the function of a 7-ring Boehm, just without the additional vent key and the typical 7-ring clutter. If there was an elegant way to do something, Bettoney typically found it if they didn't always patent it. The C# key tab that links it to the Eb ring key is patented, so if you are looking for that and don't want to have it custom made (which has to be one of the easiest customizations), just take your pick of the Bettoney offerings from about 50 years of clarinet production. It seems that all of them have this convenient innovation.

I knew that these Bettoney "covered tone hole" clarinets were made because of an old ad that appeared on ebay. I saved the tiny .jpg of the ad realizing that these clarinets, which really should have been the most popular beginner clarinet of the 20th century, were actually comparatively rare. When one sees a print ad for something that looks like a really useful innovation, but the item from the ad is very rare, one wonders what went wrong? The logical thought is that it must not have sounded good. Or it must have been poorly manufactured? Or maybe the chicks just didn't dig it?   ???  Who knows?

It never ceases to amaze me how many really good ideas seem to get put on the shelf while the mediocre ideas are mass produced. Unless it came with a significant upcharge, I don't know why it didn't catch on. The price in the ad doesn't seem out of line with student instruments of that era. Obviously what it needed was a Benny Goodman endorsement. If that had happened these would be low hanging fruit on ebay;- and more people might know how to play a clarinet. To this day, the plateau-keyed flute is the standard beginner flute. Why not the plateau-keyed clarinet? The 3* demonstrates the concept very successfully executed with no short comings in performance. To any one that is just beginning on clarinet, this is the best one to get to get started with. I would rate it top choice for a novice that wants the easiest kind to start on.

If one is patient enough the rare treasure will appear amidst the common clutter;- everything eventually comes up for auction. If one is really lucky, it will be obscured by the common clutter to the extent that no one else will notice it.  8)

So when this 3 Star plateau finally appeared and didn't get much interest, I put in an offer and the seller accepted it right away. Bettoney fans and "serious" collectors were probably busy out-bidding each other on a simultaneous auction for a Silva-Bet 7 ring type, also with plateau keys. Yes, those also exist! So I had the benefit of a major diversion going on at the critical moment this appeared. It was a nice consolation to get a clear shot at the 3* while the bids on the Silva-Bet headed skyward into oblivion.

After hearing how it plays, I think it was a very lucky find. It's a unique instrument, a pristine example of it, and it delivers in both sound and playability and is made of extremely durable materials. It came with a really nice case and all the original parts and accessories (except the mouthpiece might be a more recent substitute and appears to be hard molded plastic). I'm using a hard rubber Penzel Mueller Artist mouthpiece to test the 3*. This clarinet really is in near mint condition. The rubber is not faded or oxidized and the plating is 100%. It's the closest thing to a "new" clarinet that I have owned.

Every Bettoney instrument that I have explored so far has been a well executed design and the manufacturing quality is excellent and very consistent. This was a company that paid attention to important details particularly on their student models.

Bettoney conceived it as a beginner instrument, not as a novel design variant. As such, there is nothing about the way it works that would make switching to an open ring model problematic. It does leave one tone hole, LH4, to be covered by a finger tip, pointing to the eventual technique needed on a professional clarinet, but alleviating the complication for the novice musician of mastering both an embouchure as well as manually sealing several tone holes with rings around them. I think any beginning student would find this instrument far less intimidating than a typical beginner clarinet. For those that didn't have the benefit of playing a recorder before attempting a clarinet, this plateau keyed clarinet is a much friendlier beginning point than one with open rings. I am surprised that it was not produced and adopted in very large numbers. It should have been as popular as offset-G plateau-keyed beginner flutes.

I took some side by side photos of it with a Bettoney Cadet next to it so that the key similarities and differences would be obvious. Side by side with a Cadet model one can see that the G# and A key touches are extended so that it is easier for a small hand to reach them. On the lower joint, the RH5 key touches have been moved as close as possible to the other keys, again making the reach as easy as possible for smaller hands (The Cadet model is similar in this way).

The material of the Boston 3 Star is "ebonite" body with Bakelite barrel and bell. As I have found with other Bakelite clarinet parts, typical wear marks and scratches that appear on wood and hard rubber are absent from these Bakelite parts. The Bakelite parts appear slightly darker and glossier than the hard rubber joints and this gives the 3 Star a muted two-tone appearance that is quite attractive. The tone has more of the edge that I associate with wooden clarinets and that might be the result of the Bakelite barrel in combination with the hard rubber body. The result is very close to the reedy tonal character of a wood clarinet. The key work is nickel plated and there is almost no visible wear to be seen on this whole instrument. I don't know what the base metal is because I can't see it anywhere, but my guess is that it is similar to the base metal on the Cadet keys and those appear to be nickel plated nickel-silver.

The pads have been replaced with some kind of synthetic material that is far too spongy for my taste so even though these seal OK, they also tend to stick and the feel is not something I could get used to very easily. These work well enough to evaluate the sound and general playing character, but soon they must go. I love this clarinet.  :D I hate these pads.  :-\

The 3* was pretty close to "plays right out of the box" but It took some typical cork shimming to get the mechanisms properly synchronized. After doing the minimum tweaks, this clarinet plays very well, has excellent intonation, projection and very even response.

I don't find that there is any problem in the A > Ab > B > Bb intonation of this clarinet. The notes there aren't spot on tuning wise, running somewhat sharp, but all sharp to about the same degree. I'd say the Boston 3 Star scores very well in the intonation department in all registers and was pleasantly surprising in responsiveness and tone in general. This is supposed to be a beginner clarinet, but it sounds pretty solid and I could see using it in performance situations where I need weather resistant materials. The combination of the Bakelite barrel with the hard rubber body is a good one if that is what is creating the resulting tone.  I think it can come very close to producing the dynamics and tonal variation that I am used to getting out of my more weather sensitive wooden clarinets. Like many of my clarinet purchases, curiosity was a major factor with the 3*. It's the first plateau keyed clarinet I have explored and I was primarily interested in evaluating it for student use, but I think it is good enough to be a keeper. I will definitely be looking out for more of these with students in mind. These could greatly reduce the hurdles facing novice clarinetists.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: Silversorcerer on May 14, 2016, 12:23:14 AM
Oh, that little print ad from 1958 about the 3* Bettoney:
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: Silversorcerer on May 15, 2016, 03:55:38 PM
I took a few more shots of the Boston 3* Plateau. I've been playing it daily now for a few days, getting used to it. This clarinet plays very well. I can play 4 Ees with relative ease using the Penzel Mueller Artist MP and a LaVoz medium reed. The response, tone and projection are really good and as I get used to it, I can get it to do most of the things I want it to.

The first shot in bright sun shows that the bell and barrel are the same material, but not the same as the ebonite body. These parts are both original to the instrument and are Bakelite. There are several other clarinet makers that used similar material combinations. Many times we assume a part that is a different material is not original, but often the original parts of vintage clarinets were made from combinations of materials. In the case of this 3* it has an ebonite body with Bakelite bell and barrel. There are also Bettoney wood models with Bakelite bell and barrel and those that are completely made of the processed wood Bakelite composite, as well as some that are completely ebonite and some wooden ones with ebonite bells. It seems that Bettoney very frequently made clarinets featuring more than one material.

The second photo shows it set up with the Penzel Mueller Artist MP. This particular one is hard rubber. Penzel Mueller made some Bakelite mouthpieces as well as some hard plastic ones. I'm using my standard braided and waxed cotton string ligature with a LaVoz medium. I use this mouthpiece with several different clarinets so it's a good one to use to compare the Bettoney and it works well with it.

In overall appearance, the 3* doesn't look too different from a standard 6-ring clarinet. If it were fitted with dark inlays on the plateaus, it would be a stealth plateau model.

The last photo shows the back side of the lower joint bridge key mechanism, and it shows how each plateau key is separately adjusted to close the B key and lift the lever. Getting these adjustments correctly set is critical to getting this to play like a well set up 6 ring clarinet.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on May 15, 2016, 05:16:48 PM
That bridge key mechanism is definitely pretty interesting.  I guess it has to be there, as each key has to move independently of the others due to its plateau mechanism - meaning that converting a normal clarinet to plateau would require quite a bit of creative fabrication...
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: Silversorcerer on May 15, 2016, 09:08:53 PM
Each one of those LJ plateau keys has an independent wire spring. There's a short post that has a spring coming out both sides. There's a lot of stuff packed under that one rod. Regulating it is setting up three keys to operate the B and bridge > Eb exactly the same way. Once it is working, it works very well. It is very tight key work and I notice that the post locking screws are almost everywhere. It's very well built.

Converting ring keys to plateau keys would be quite tricky on most clarinets because on most of them the ring keys operate on a solid rod with a pivot screw. Independent plateau keys require a rod. My guess is that the tone holes have to be somewhat different sizes also. I'm interested in what this one measures under the plateaus. Whatever the approach to getting the intonation right, it was successful. My guess is that a plateau design is a bit tricky for a number of reasons. Bettoney seems to have thought this one through pretty completely.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: Silversorcerer on May 18, 2016, 08:19:09 AM
I started wondering about the price of the Boston 3-Star plateau in the ad and what that would translate to in current currency. The ad was from 1958 and I was born in 1959, so I do have some first hand experience with the prices at that time and what the instruments my siblings and I played and how those were priced. The 3* was close to par for the course.

Inflation is the common term we use to describe currency dilution. According to the ad, the 3* was $142.50 in 1958. Using this convenient DOLLAR$ to dollar$ conversion page here: http://www.dollartimes.com/inflation/inflation.php?amount=1&year=1958

So, this nice little Boston 3-star should get the respect it deserves because this is a clarinet that was priced at $1186.78 in today dollars. What kind of clarinet would that buy you today? I should tweak it and put it next to several new clarinets in that price category to see how it measures up in performance. Right now, I can tell you that it is an easy player, but to really do this correctly we need blind side by side comparisons. I might try to do this. This instrument is so close to brand new that I could probably convince a few youngsters that aren't clarinet historians that it is a prototype model of a new instrument and get them to compare it to what they are playing in school and then have them guess the market price of the soon to be manufactured "prototype".

That would remove the bias toward new if this were presented as "innovative new ergonomic key technology" and "high-tech all weather composite materials".  What would the consumers think about this clarinet if they didn't know it was an antique?

Of course there are many factors that go into comparing an economy at one point in history to an economy a half century later, but for general purposes the comparison is useful.

The more interesting aspect of it is that even though it is still exactly the same clarinet and in near perfect condition, I paid less than 50 today $$ for it. That illustrates the consumer value of "new" vs. "antique". It is worth(?) less than 5% of its' original value according to the current sales events. Completely tweaked with the best pads available, it would be difficult to get even 25% of the original value. This is not a "functional" antique in poor/fair cosmetic condition. This one is near perfect. Just to drive the point home, here's one more good photo of the 3*
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on May 18, 2016, 09:06:01 AM
I guess people just won't want it unless it's a new Selmer or buffet. This might have something to do with many band directors and private tutors recommending brand new instruments to their students.  There's obviously nothing inherently wrong with vintage, but the market value is just so low.

I like your idea of a blind test. It should be fun to see the reactions when told that they were actually playing on a 60-year-old instrument!
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: Silversorcerer on May 18, 2016, 02:32:29 PM
If you go to the primary 2nd-hand selling site, there is an option at the top of the page to "shop by brand", and of course they only give you three choices. There are good used and vintage instruments made by those brands, but the way it is presented is as if those are the only brands of clarinets that ever existed. Vintage is a whole different category. My approach is to ignore those 3 brands because I realize that everyone else is being directed to them. I'm picking in a different orchard entirely.

I am sure that the band directors and "educators" in general are quite responsible, if not accountable. Add the peer pressure factor that determines most student choices and it's down to which company has the best PR department. It was the same when I was a kid. We all had Conn Director cornets, saxs, and trombones in my beginning band class. A couple of kids had other instruments. If it was something old, they were made to feel like lepers. Old was definitely not "cool" during the 1960s. And generally the older instruments that a school owned would not be in good repair so the lack of proper repair and maintenance reinforced the idea that new was always better.

And the band directors are too young now to remember any of these old instruments and lost brands. If I were a band director, I'd be nearing retirement.

One of my friend's kids had a Bachinese trumpet fail on him and I looked it over and thought that it was not really worth fixing. I gave that child an instrument that cost me less than the repairs his needed to play again, if it could even be fixed. It took a pencil point dent in a valve casing and that was it;- frozen valve. A Conn Director might have been scratched by something like that, but not ruined. So I set the kid up with a 1961 Conn Director with the Coprion bell. His band director had never even seen one and was quite impressed.

The young band directors have no idea that these are commonly available and of course all of the later student horns are so poorly built that the assumption is that any instrument that is old must be worn out. All it takes is the typical disparaging snob comments that other students with new vanilla instruments make on web forums and the vintage market becomes primarily the territory of collectors.

So I am thinking now, what would the reaction be of a band director if a student came in with this 3* plateau clarinet in a generic black zipper case for first year band? It's Bakelite and hard rubber, so it looks very similar to the plastic clarinets. And it looks brand new. "Hmmm. I  see you have a ... Three Star???? (it doesn't even say Bettoney on it anywhere) Is that something you bought on the internet?" "No, my Mom got it from the Silversorcerer.... ;D" "Well, yes that looks very nice.... But the keys, they look;- let me see that...."  :o "No, Susie! If I let you use that one it would be like cheating!" Which is entirely my point. This one is the "head start" model.  ;) Go, Susie, go! "Susie, I think your instrument is defective. Every time I use the C# side key it moves the Eb ring key....." "Well, yes Mr. B.D, that's a defect patented about a century ago....."

I could see why a band director would favor the common flavor;- and it is mostly a selfish reason.

 I remember one older cornet in my first year that belonged to Cathy Jackson and it had belonged to her grandfather. It was French and it was raw brass and heavily engraved. It was probably from the 1920s or 1930s but we all thought it was ancient in 1971. It was probably a good instrument, but Cathy got a Conn for Christmas;- so she would have one like everyone else. Even then my Conn Director was ten years older than most of them and had a factory re-fresh done on it. Mine was like new but about 3/4 the price. It had nickel highlights. I could spot it among the rest of them because of the nickel details. Those nickel on brass details of my first cornet could be why I favor your two-tone trademarks.

Almost all of the flutes and clarinets were Bundy. One girl had a Selmer clarinet that was made of wood and we all thought that was pretty old fashioned. It also had the old style hard wooden box case. If a company could get in good with both the major local music store and the school board, the sales of new instruments were a foregone conclusion. Does it work the same way now? Everything is the same except there are fewer band programs, fewer students, and fewer brands of instruments. It has become a binary marketplace. If there are more than two choices, it's too confusing.  ???

One day I want to be a band director. And if you want to play, you must have an instrument older than your parents. It can be any brand except brand new. That would save them enough money to pay me to restore their instruments.  ;D
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on May 18, 2016, 03:08:06 PM
There's definitely a stigma on older instruments.  When I was in high school, not that long ago, the only kids without new instruments were the poor ones who had to rent from a shop or the school.  Without regard to playing ability, they were immediately seen as second-class players.

I always think it's fun to bring something different to a rehearsal and watch people hem and haw and try to figure out what's going on.  Once I brought a metal clarinet to the music store asking where I could get some screws and posts for it.  The repairman looked it over, gingerly, and said "is this a flute...?"

I currently play a metal alto clarinet and nobody can figure out what it is. 
Is that a saxophone? 
No, it's an alto clarinet. 
Don't you mean alto saxophone? 
No, I mean alto clarinet. 
What's an alto clarinet?
and so on.

Luckily, our resident instrument prodigy knows even more than I do about old instruments (one of his *many* instruments is a 1920s Heckel contrabassoon) isn't fazed by anything i bring in.  But everybody else is left scratching their heads, trying to figure out what the heck a "Kohlert" is.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: Silversorcerer on May 18, 2016, 09:03:40 PM
Mostly I just show up with really old instruments, and usually not the same one twice in a row.

The only really odd instruments I have are circular mellophones. They look mostly like French horns so that is what people think they are. I have a couple that can be tuned to any key from D to F. So I can read sax parts or French horn parts depending on how the slides are set. It does have a sound similar to a French horn so that is very useful to be able to have that sound but be reading an alto sax real book chart. It's a jazz French horn, sort of. I think there was only one person who released a jazz album using a mellophone. Conn did make one that has a circular body with an in line bell and lead pipe. Those are closer to marching mellophones used now, but it still has the circular body.

The confusions that surprise me are when people don't know what instrument my Frank Holton trumpet or very normal Pedler clarinet are.

I'm thinking this 3* could slip under the radar at a jam session;- particularly if I were to put some black masking tape dots on the plateau keys;- stealth plateau mode. It does reduce the chances of squeaks and squawks here and there that happen with leaky finger technique, but there is a down side to these keys. They are quite slippery and I don't get as good a grip on the instrument. I think the masking tape would also resolve that issue.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: Silversorcerer on May 19, 2016, 02:08:37 PM
OK, after a few days practicing at home with the Boston 3* I took it to a rehearsal and am happy to report that it blends in quite well on supporting parts and can also shine well on a solo. The intonation was quite impressive. It doesn't suffer from bi-polar intonation disorder. I switched between it and my wooden Pedler Premier and there was not any real noticeable difference in the way it sounds. It has really good tone and dynamics and can be played with equal expression. I am using a Goldentone 3 on the Pedler, which has more edge than most of my hard rubber mouthpieces. It's some kind of hard plastic. The tone of the 3* when played with the hard rubber mouthpiece is very close to the Pedler with the Goldentone.

The only thing that really can't be done with plateau keys is glissandos and the same could be said for plateau keyed flutes. Certain rhapsodies might be compromised. Even so, I still think a plateau keyed clarinet is a better instrument for most beginners. What I see with the current situation in school bands is that students are expected to upgrade their instruments to the so-called "step up" models between junior high band and high school band and many of them do.

The expectation of a middle-school to high-school upgrade means that the beginner instrument could be a plateau model like the 3* and speed rather than impede learning progress. It would allow a beginner to focus on the embouchure and tone production more than on covering tone holes and I think that would be a big help to most beginning clarinet players. The trumpet players get away with three sealed valves with buttons and the flute players get keys with pads so why should the clarinet players be made to suffer such difficulty? Glissandos are not necessarily advanced technique but typically that is not expected of a two or three year school band student.

So what kind of common sense type of musical instrument maker is going to build the 21st Century 3* plateau-keyed beginner clarinet? I see a completely untapped, albeit revolutionary opportunity.

It really needs to be someone who isn't trapped by the corporate stagnation in innovation. It needs to be made of hard rubber for durability as well as great tone. It needs to be available at a beginner instrument price point. I'm putting it out here as a challenge, an invitation, an opportunity and offering an already existing successful design model in the Boston 3*.

Is there a clarinet maker out there hearing me?  ;)
Should there be a new name in this thread? Build it and the students will love you if no one else does.

 
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: andybeals on May 31, 2016, 07:44:01 AM
There's definitely a stigma on older instruments.  When I was in high school, not that long ago, the only kids without new instruments were the poor ones who had to rent from a shop or the school.  Without regard to playing ability, they were immediately seen as second-class players.

I always think it's fun to bring something different to a rehearsal and watch people hem and haw and try to figure out what's going on. 

I keep hearing from other woodwind people that (a) wooden instruments are "blown out" over time and (b) cracks (that go all the way through) are inherently fatal. 

As a woodworker, I know that wood does shrink (and grow) with humidity/temperature, but also that wood gets harder (and darker (how much varies by species)) as it cures.  Generally, most of this hardening has happened before the billets are slapped into the lathe and formed into a clarinet.  I can certainly understand subtle changes to tone-holes (which is why we value our technicians' ability to regulate our instruments) and post-holes (which can be filled easily enough), but save for a major defect, which would/should have evidenced itself in the billet stage, changes to the instrument should be minor.  As a tropical hardwood, grenadilla (blackwood, mpingo, zebrawood, Dalbergia melanoxylon), it's going to be resistant to bugs and moisture, and relative to the other members of its genus (Brazilian rosewood, cocobolo, Indian rosewood, tulipwood, etc.), it's even more water-resistant. 

As an endangered wood, more effort should be put into conserving the clarinets we already have. 



As to bringing old instruments into rehearsal, I've passed around a Clemens Meinel B♭ clarinet (full Boehm, with German-style rollers on the G# and F keys, but it has the expected cluster of five keys under your right-hand pinky) to the other clarinetists and they found it to just "felt strange" under their fingers, even though it "played well" for them.  (My only complaint about it is that the mouthpiece socket is wider than normal, which requires a freshly-corked mouthpiece rather than one that's been compressed over time.)  I've also brought in a century-old stencil-horn cornet after I had it lovingly restored and showed it to the trumpet section behind me.  While I had heard them talk about playing cornet parts, little did I know that some of them not only swapped to a cornet to play those parts (I'm sure the composer is thanking them for that), but also at least two of them pulled out their own antique cornets to show to me, as those are the instruments they like to play on. 



This chart suggests a 0.5mm difference in tenon diameter between a German mouthpiece and a French one. 

http://www.schwenk-und-seggelke.de/englisch/klarinetten_birnen.php (http://www.schwenk-und-seggelke.de/englisch/klarinetten_birnen.php)

Martin Freres suggests a 0.35mm difference

http://martinfreres.net/clarinetcatalog/accessories/barrels/clarinet-barrel-frequently-asked-questions-faq/ (http://martinfreres.net/clarinetcatalog/accessories/barrels/clarinet-barrel-frequently-asked-questions-faq/)

Maybe I'd be better off getting a barrel made for my preferred mouthpiece.  (Fobes)
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: Silversorcerer on June 01, 2016, 06:55:08 AM
I double on cornet myself, and prefer a 1919 Conn New Wonder. It has three "plateau" keys. I think the open hole version is a kind of wooden horn called a cornetto.

There definitely should be a concerted effort to restore more older wooden clarinets. What I observe is similar to what I observed with acoustic guitars;- the farther back you go the better the quality of the wood. With clarinets it also seems like the fit of the key work is better on the older top end models;- and the metal of the key work is also a better alloy base metal and better plating.

There are wooden clarinets that become very distorted and ovoid to a very obvious degree. Some of those are beyond redemption. The typical shrinkage we see that causes loose bell rings not of much consequence.

Minor changes in the shape of the tube due to weather were generally anticipated by woodwind makers. I see this often on clarinets where I can follow the grain orientation at least through the two joints, but very often through the barrel as well and less often the bell. The strategy is more easily observed on maple recorders. If the parts are made with the grain matched around the diameter then the parts are less likely to develop a poor fit and become loose or stuck at the sockets.

The collective perception of new is somewhat flawed particularly with regard to wooden musical instruments. New does not equate to "perfect" and can't equate to perfect because the wood is a dynamic material. If it was perfect the day it left the factory, then it will not be perfect 6 months later because regularly playing will have caused it to change. Hopefully it will not cause it to crack, but sometimes it does. If what is "perfect" is stability in the wood, then it becomes more "perfect" with age. It might need adjustments to compensate for aging, but that is a result of the dynamics at work in the material. Once the material settles down a clarinet will probably not need adjustments as frequently.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on June 21, 2016, 12:19:47 AM
Been a while since I've seen a plateau of any kind:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Malerne-vintage-wood-plateau-Bb-Clarinet-/172248245410?hash=item281acba4a2:g:7LAAAOSwmtJXaCEe
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: Silversorcerer on June 21, 2016, 06:50:35 AM
That's nice enough that a couple of pics for the record are in order. I love to see how different makers approach this concept. When it's all 7 plateau keys, the concept is an end unto itself. When it is 6, it's an early learning step.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: philpedler on June 26, 2016, 05:36:27 AM
I just want to say thanks for this thread! Great idea, Dave!
The interest is higher than ever in plateau clarinets because of the number of senior bands today.
They're great for arthritic hands.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on June 26, 2016, 02:47:48 PM
I just want to say thanks for this thread! Great idea, Dave!
The interest is higher than ever in plateau clarinets because of the number of senior bands today.
They're great for arthritic hands.
No problem - that's what I'm here for  8) 8)
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on July 29, 2016, 06:59:52 AM
Here's one:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Old-unusual-Bb-Clarinet-w-covered-soundholes-Jazz-Clarinet-Needs-repair-/131890412260?hash=item1eb547fae4:g:5-cAAOSwIgNXmLmb
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: mechanic on July 29, 2016, 02:21:22 PM

http://www.ebay.com/itm/122054331951?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

Ending soon, but the Normandy in this one is a plateau.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on July 29, 2016, 07:02:33 PM

http://www.ebay.com/itm/122054331951?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

Ending soon, but the Normandy in this one is a plateau.

Won the bid at a price of $23.83 per instrument.  The clarinets should sell for $100+ each, and assuming I can get the necessary rods and screws for the oboe, that's another $250.  Otherwise, probably $100 or so.  May be able to squeeze a couple dozen dollars of profit out of this :)
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: andybeals on July 30, 2016, 07:35:11 AM
Oh wow, The Starving Musician is still in business!    They were well-known in the bay area for this bumper sticker:

Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: mechanic on July 30, 2016, 09:02:36 AM


Won the bid at a price of $23.83 per instrument.  The clarinets should sell for $100+ each, and assuming I can get the necessary rods and screws for the oboe, that's another $250.  Otherwise, probably $100 or so.  May be able to squeeze a couple dozen dollars of profit out of this :)
[/quote]

Glad to see you got them, especially at that price.  I was going to jump into it.  Unfortunately, if I brought 6 more instruments into the house without finishing and unloading some of what I already have, I'd be living in my truck in a heartbeat.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on July 30, 2016, 04:29:34 PM
Didn't realize until after that the Normandy was missing the Ab key! Oh well, I should have a donor clarinet that will work.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: andybeals on July 30, 2016, 06:35:42 PM
Are all the bridge keys (uj/lj) there and working?  The upper bridge key is generally attached in a weak way. 
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on July 30, 2016, 09:47:29 PM
Are all the bridge keys (uj/lj) there and working?  The upper bridge key is generally attached in a weak way.

No clue!  Sure hope so...  I'll let you know once I receive it :)
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: andybeals on August 23, 2016, 07:17:16 AM
An A.Lefevres Paris plateau keyed (with MOP-ish touches) clarinet currently living in Portugal

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Clarinet-Klarinette-B-flat-A-Lefevres-Paris-closed-keys-Mouthpiece-Selmer-/322222350091?hash=item4b05f2df0b:g:nDkAAOSwU-pXuy4J (http://www.ebay.com/itm/Clarinet-Klarinette-B-flat-A-Lefevres-Paris-closed-keys-Mouthpiece-Selmer-/322222350091?hash=item4b05f2df0b:g:nDkAAOSwU-pXuy4J)
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on August 23, 2016, 03:57:18 PM
Now that's neat.  A Lefevres arent all that common to start off with, and a plateau?  Sweet.  Not for that price, though...
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: andybeals on August 23, 2016, 04:35:18 PM
I've seen another PT seller (maybe the same person) over-pricing and continually re-listing items before. If memory serves, prices are usually in Pounds Sterling.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on September 12, 2016, 12:03:55 AM
http://www.ebay.com/itm/PEDLER-COVERTYPE-PLATEAU-SYSTEM-METAL-CLARINET-/182276057594?hash=item2a707fe9fa:g:NdcAAOSw-kdX0X53

Here we go!
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: Airflyte on September 12, 2016, 08:20:41 AM
http://www.ebay.com/itm/PEDLER-COVERTYPE-PLATEAU-SYSTEM-METAL-CLARINET-/182276057594?hash=item2a707fe9fa:g:NdcAAOSw-kdX0X53

Here we go!

Same seller that just sold the sad Selmer!  Say that real fast ten times  ;D
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: Windsong on September 18, 2016, 09:30:24 PM
Now that's neat.  A Lefevres arent all that common to start off with, and a plateau?  Sweet.  Not for that price, though...
Krikey!  And it sold.  Very hard to believe, but if those stats repeat twice more,  I'll know my next market.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: Windsong on September 18, 2016, 09:34:00 PM
Here we go!
[/quote]
Same seller that just sold the sad Selmer!  Say that real fast ten times  ;D
[/quote]

Quite the discrepancy in sale price, so I'm inclined to think it's brand or era driven.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: Silversorcerer on April 15, 2017, 08:44:41 AM
I'm bringing this one here as well as on the "good things on ebay" thread because the discussion here is more relevant as well as my comments on the example that I play tested. This Bettoney beginner's 3* plateau keyed model, which is well described and photographed above including the regulation details and playability is one of only two I have seen. I would recommend this to anyone as it is a gorgeous little USA jewel and plays extremely well and sounds really good also. The way it is made and finished is unique among plateaus (one open hole remains), exquisitely designed and built as usual for all Bettoney clarinets I have play tested from the pro models to the beginner models. http://www.ebay.com/itm/302277691368?ssPageName=STRK:MESINDXX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1436.l2649

I wouldn't generally be so forward with an auction link, but the competition was already hot. Good luck.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on April 15, 2017, 09:25:37 AM
I'm bringing this one here as well as on the "good things on ebay" thread because the discussion here is more relevant as well as my comments on the example that I play tested. This Bettoney beginner's 3* plateau keyed model, which is well described and photographed above including the regulation details and playability is one of only two I have seen. I would recommend this to anyone as it is a gorgeous little USA jewel and plays extremely well and sounds really good also. The way it is made and finished is unique among plateaus (one open hole remains), exquisitely designed and built as usual for all Bettoney clarinets I have play tested from the pro models to the beginner models. http://www.ebay.com/itm/302277691368?ssPageName=STRK:MESINDXX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1436.l2649

I wouldn't generally be so forward with an auction link, but the competition was already hot. Good luck.
I'm most intrigued by the lack of a plateau on the third hole.
I've seen a variety of plateau mechanisms:
just thumb (Mazzeo)
all but thumb (Bottali)
just thumb, 3rd and 6th holes (Bundy semi-plateau)

But never one with all but the 3rd hole. If anything, I would think that would be the one hole most critical to have a plateau.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on June 10, 2017, 09:00:48 PM
Here's a neat one

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Guy-Humphrey-Plateau-Style-Clarinet-/192213673849?hash=item2cc0d3e779:g:WZ8AAOSwyWZZPGiU
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: noneyet on September 09, 2017, 10:01:33 PM
I'm most intrigued by the lack of a plateau on the third hole.
I've seen a variety of plateau mechanisms:
just thumb (Mazzeo)
all but thumb (Bottali)
just thumb, 3rd and 6th holes (Bundy semi-plateau)
But never one with all but the 3rd hole. If anything, I would think that would be the one hole most critical to have a plateau.

I have a Beacon with all but 3rd and thumb plateaued. I'll post pics when I'm done hiding from the hurricane  >:(
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on September 09, 2017, 11:37:16 PM
I'm most intrigued by the lack of a plateau on the third hole.
I've seen a variety of plateau mechanisms:
just thumb (Mazzeo)
all but thumb (Bottali)
just thumb, 3rd and 6th holes (Bundy semi-plateau)
But never one with all but the 3rd hole. If anything, I would think that would be the one hole most critical to have a plateau.

I have a Beacon with all but 3rd and thumb plateaued. I'll post pics when I'm done hiding from the hurricane  >:(
Sounds like a rarity! I look forward to seeing it.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: Silversorcerer on September 11, 2017, 07:30:55 AM
Beacon of Boston is usually a Bettoney stencil. That should be quite a bit like the Boston 3* model that posted photos of above. It has plateaus everywhere except the C tone hole. It does have one for the thumb as well. Photos?
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: noneyet on September 11, 2017, 05:01:36 PM
Photos will come when my power comes back on  :-[
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: Silversorcerer on September 13, 2017, 12:04:22 PM
I feel you. Mine went out and when they fixed it, the computer will not boot. I think th power supply is dead. I'm posting from a tablet. No photos from me until it's fixed or I figure out how to post tablet pics. I'm sure it's possible. One of those new relics is some kind of early plateau system.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: noneyet on September 20, 2017, 04:27:19 PM
Now that life has attained a post-hurricane normalcy (for the time being, anyway) here are the promised pictures of my Beacon Plateau. As you can see there are plateaus on all RH holes, LH 1, LH 2, but not on LH 3 or on the LH thumb. Kind of odd, eh? Also, the serial numbers are horizontal so I'm guessing Silver is right about Beacons being a Bettoney stencil.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: Silversorcerer on September 21, 2017, 10:17:19 AM
That's definitely a Bettoney (of Boston) Beacon. The name comes from Beacon hill in Boston. Look back up in this thread at the photos of the Boston 3*, which is identical.

These were intended as beginner instruments, so they left a couple of holes open.

Other Bettoney features:

The posts for the right pinkie levers are slightly offset, the G# touch is extended for easier reach, and the C# key might engage the Eb key (upper joint).

On mine, the C lever needs a pin to keep the friction fit from slipping, and someone substituted squishy synthetic pads that I don't like.

In spite of small things I can correct, it's a very easy player and sounds great too.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on September 21, 2017, 10:44:58 AM
That's funny, the semi-plateau I have is a Bundy that is almost the exact opposite: all keys are open except for the thumb, LH3 and RH3.
http://www.clarinetpages.net/vintage-plastic-composite-clarinets/bundy/bundy-mazzeo
Title: Re: RE: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: Silversorcerer on September 26, 2017, 11:54:22 AM
here is the list of plateau keyed clarinet makers so far:

Boehm:
Pedler
Vito
D. Noblet (Leblanc - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JN4OX-yefbY&feature=endscreen&NR=1)
Normandy

Albert:
Console
Conn

Simple:
Lyon and Healy (information courtesy of the National Music Museum)
Brevetto Bottali

So (again thanks to noneyet) we get to see one of the Lyon & Healy Albert full plateau models up close. This one says "own maker" and Chicago, but the thumb rest has a German accent, I think.

While all the parts (that aren't missing) have an A stamped on them, the upper joint also is marked Bb L. It measures to Bb dimensions. It should be easy to find a working barrel and MP.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10215339676351784&l=5d632b29d6

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10215339676391785&l=1056628e55

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10215339676431786&l=b03ca8c9b2
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: windydankoff on October 23, 2017, 06:03:15 AM
A friend of a friend is a studio musician in LA. Plays sax, no problem. Needs to add clarinet to his bag but he has a mild disability in his hands and cannot connect with the open holes. He is looking for a plateau clarinet, at least something to start on. If he does well with it, he knows of a shop that can modify a good instrument for him. Anything out there among you aficionados on the Clarinet Pages?
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on October 23, 2017, 08:55:01 AM
Man, that would be a tough one. The best quality plateau I can think of that is relatively widely available is the wood Normandy 10P, which I think would be a good one to stick with. Modifications would be kind of a nightmare to do...
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: RickInSaltLake on October 23, 2017, 09:54:26 AM
I came across this listing in the web classified ads of a local news outlet here in Salt Lake City, Utah.  I know nothing about the instrument or the seller, and don't vouch for or represent them in any way.  I'm just passing along this information in response to Windy's request.

I think this is the only plateau clarinet I've ever seen in these listings, which I check three or four times a month.

The ad says it is a LeBlanc purchased new from a local instrument retailer about two years ago.  https://www.ksl.com/classifieds/listing/45998082

Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on October 23, 2017, 02:36:33 PM
Interesting, I didn't know that Vito made plateau clarinets to this day.

That looks like a Vito V40 or some other plastic vito. A bit hard to tell.
Price is reasonable; I sold a Normandy 140P (resinite material) for $450 last month.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: Airflyte on January 16, 2018, 11:21:24 AM
Did anyone watch the Selmer on shopgoodwill???

It went from 125-500 in seconds.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: lallman on March 23, 2018, 12:07:29 PM
Some plateau Clarinets were branded as "Normandy," but I think they are exactly the same as those labeled "Vito," as they were both made by LeBlanc in Wisconsin.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: lallman on March 23, 2018, 12:11:05 PM
In 1970, in my first teaching position, there were several band members who had plateau system clarinets. My predecessor had a LeBlanc dealership.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on March 23, 2018, 03:02:54 PM
Some plateau Clarinets were branded as "Normandy," but I think they are exactly the same as those labeled "Vito," as they were both made by LeBlanc in Wisconsin.
LeBlanc generally had 3 levels of “quality” in their clarinets.
Lowest were student model Vito, usually made of plastics
Second up was the Normandy, made of either resonite or wood
Top of the line was LeBlanc itself, generally referred to as LeBlanc Paris to distinguish it from the rest of the line. These were always made of wood.

There usually wasn’t much of a difference between resonite Vito and Normandy models. Maybe a bit better quality control or something, but not enough to really make a big difference.

There was sometimes a “cascade” of quality, as I call it. This refers to instruments that couldn’t pass quality control being rebranded as one level below.
So for example you may have something that started life as a LeBlanc Paris but something was up and it became a Normandy 4 or something. And then you’d have Normandy get knocked down to Vito VSP, for example.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on March 23, 2018, 03:04:13 PM
In 1970, in my first teaching position, there were several band members who had plateau system clarinets. My predecessor had a LeBlanc dealership.
I wonder why players aren’t that common anymore. In various  high school, college and church bands from 2009 to now I’ve never seen a single player with a plateau.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: windydankoff on April 03, 2018, 09:08:38 PM
Link to a Guy Humphrey metal plateau:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/1930s-Guy-Humphrey-Paris-5-Piece-Metal-Clarinet-with-Case/372263300784?_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIM.MBE%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D44039%26meid%3D726ed4e974cc488a934b94a4b0bace77%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D2%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D282909255161%26itm%3D372263300784&_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: lallman on September 20, 2018, 04:51:54 PM
Have several professionally reconditioned plateau clarinets For Sale. New Valentino pads, keys regulated/adjusted. Like new key buttons.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on September 20, 2018, 05:17:55 PM
Have several professionally reconditioned plateau clarinets For Sale. New Valentino pads, keys regulated/adjusted. Like new key buttons.

Please create a separate thread for sales posts! This thread is for discussion of the clarinets themselves.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: LarryS on October 04, 2018, 07:55:52 AM
I didnt know such instruments existed! I've heard of plateau flutes (I have one) but never knew they existed in clarinets!
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: licorice on February 16, 2020, 11:41:39 PM
I've owned a few plateau models over the years: a couple of Normandys, Bettony, modern Vito, Mazzeo, etc. I even had a Leblanc LL pro model. The one I've kept all these years was a Normandy that sounded the best of all. Somebody put a lot of cork pads in this. I will also say that none of the plateau clars I've played are as loud as an open holed instrument.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on January 28, 2021, 11:48:05 PM
Been a while since a post here. Mr Allman sent me a great collection of plateau clarinets, pretty much every distinct model that Normandy ever produced.
Here's one!
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: DaveLeBlanc on January 28, 2021, 11:48:37 PM
Been a while since a post here. Mr Allman sent me a great collection of plateau clarinets, pretty much every distinct model that Normandy ever produced.
Here's one!
Adding that gold in the logos really brings it out.
Title: Re: Official Plateau Keyed Clarinet Thread
Post by: sisface23 on December 02, 2021, 12:31:21 PM
I have this cross-posted in the Harry Pedler thread and thought it should go here too.

Harry Pedler "Covertype" metal plateau clarinet

Bell reads: Pedler, Covertype, Harry Pedler Co, Elkhart IND
Serial # 18XXX

It has a tunable barrel and adjustable keys
Came with original Harry Pedler lyre and a guarantee bond certificate that looks to be signed by Sid Pedler (younger son of Harry's)