The ClarinetPages Forum

Clarinet Roadshow => All about Clarinets => Topic started by: LarryS on January 15, 2022, 04:05:54 PM

Title: The benefit of open holes
Post by: LarryS on January 15, 2022, 04:05:54 PM
Clarinet players can glide seamlessly between adjacent notes, whereas sax players have to play all the notes in a run in very quick sequence. Is it not possible for saxophones to have open holes, with rings?  Also if I was a flute player I would rather have one with open holes. (I've tried flute countless times. Though its my favourite sounding woodwind instrument I cannot get to grips with the embouchure)

https://youtu.be/W0-inuOu1Io
Title: Re: The benefit of open holes
Post by: jdbassplayer on January 15, 2022, 06:00:12 PM
Saxophones have huge tone holes. Even on Sopranino sax the lowest tone holes would be too large to cover. Also on most sizes of sax the fingers are not always directly above a tone hole meaning the instrument would need a complete redesign.

The closest instrument to an open hole sax would be a Boehm system tarogato.
Title: Re: The benefit of open holes
Post by: LarryS on January 16, 2022, 03:55:59 AM
Saxophones have huge tone holes. Even on Sopranino sax the lowest tone holes would be too large to cover. Also on most sizes of sax the fingers are not always directly above a tone hole meaning the instrument would need a complete redesign.

The closest instrument to an open hole sax would be a Boehm system tarogato.
Oh I'd love to try a tarogato
Title: Re: The benefit of open holes
Post by: TMHeimer on January 25, 2022, 02:30:14 PM
It must be hard to gliss on the sax without open holes-- like glissing through throat tones or other "key" notes on clarinet. Lots of jaw movement I assume.