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Messages - Dibbs

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31
Neat! That's an Albert system with plateau keys. You don't see those around very much at all.

A real shame about the lower keys though. Someone tore those off with great force!

Sax fingered, I'd say, not Albert.  Look at the RH tone hole arrangement.   Cabart made sax fingered oboes too.

32
All about Clarinets / Re: C hole with ring
« on: January 30, 2021, 04:04:53 AM »
...
Not really an issue, but I thought I'd mention that it moves the tone hole in line with the others, instead of off to the side like other clarinets.

Yes, I'm playing a 7 ringer at the moment.  It feels a little bit weird.  It needs a slight readjustment of hand position.

33

It's just a different way to implement the 7th ring.  No better or worse than the usual way.

I take that back.  There is a small advantage in that the D#/A# cross key is excessively high with the normal full boehm arrangement because it lies on top of the extra vent cup.  With the doughnut that key can be at the normal height.

34
Have you guys done a test and seen if the donut key actually has any noticeable impact on intonation versus the non-donut Eb fingering?

(I haven't, but I can't imagine it does much, or else it would be ubiquitous today, right?)

It's just a different way to implement the 7th ring.  No better or worse than the usual way. 

35
Thanks for showing this one! What is the purpose of the "donut" key vs. a normal ring key?
It can be partly covered by just pressing the edge.

They'll be sharp if you use it like that.  At least on the one I tried.

36
Thanks for showing this one! What is the purpose of the "donut" key vs. a normal ring key?


Cross fingered Eb/Bb in combination with the extra ring.

37
All about Clarinets / Re: Scale shifted from CDE toABC
« on: January 23, 2021, 06:09:20 AM »
I just looked up the Prelude CL 711

It's a Bb clarinet.  You should hear.  Bb C and D.  My guess is that your embouchure is underdeveloped and you are playing very flat.  Firm it up a bit and maybe try a slightly harder reed.

38
All about Clarinets / Re: Scale shifted from CDE toABC
« on: January 23, 2021, 06:05:51 AM »
If the notes you describe are correct then the scale isn't the same.  C,D,E would transpose to A,B,C#.

However I suspect that is what you are hearing and you have a clarinet in A.

That's how it's supposed to work.  The clarinet is a transposing instrument and the notes you hear are not the same as  those written.

Most clarinets are in Bb so written C,D,E would play Bb,C,D.  A clarinet in A is not unusual but is only really used in classical music as a second instrument besides the Bb.

If it really is playing A,B and C natural then something very strange is happening.

39
All about Clarinets / Re: Playing in the second octave
« on: January 14, 2021, 08:30:44 AM »
There's nothing wrong with a Yamaha 4C.  In my opinion it's fine at your stage of development, just starting to play in the clarion register.  There's no need to go down the mouthpiece rabbit hole for at least two or three years.  You're really not equipped to evaluate them yet.  For example, I use a Pomarico crystal mouthpiece mostly because of the tone in the lower altissimo (creamy smooth) and ease of speaking in the upper altissimo.  That's the whole of the octave above what you are currently trying to achieve.   I'd be happy to use that Yamaha if I didn't have to play much above altissimo G.

I really think you'd do best to concentrate on learning to make what you have work.

As for reeds it should work with 2.0 to 2.5 legeres fine.  You would do much better to practice more than to mess with different mouthpieces.

40
All about Clarinets / Re: Hard rubber conditioner
« on: January 11, 2021, 01:33:27 PM »
Dictionary, any substance used in or resulting from a reaction involving changes to atoms or molecules, esp one derived artificially for practical use .
So technically you would be correct.  It is formed naturally then separated by other means. The base is still created by a natural process as opposed to being say combined in a test tube. In a common sense usage I would not consider it to be on the same level as say cyanide or Ammonia. I would think most people associate chemicals with harmful substances. Vegetable glycerine, unless you are allergic to the source plant, is basically harmless. It is not a bi-product so much but an adative to moisturizes, soaps, beauty products, food etc.
I would.think this would be a preferable option to the previously mentioned MG Chemicals 408A or something else of that sort.

Glycerine is not formed naturally.  It is made by a chemical reaction called saponification that also makes soap.  It's also a waste product in the making of bio-diesel and it can be made completely synthetically from propylene.

However it is made, it is exactly the same substance whether from animal or vegetable sources.

The idea that chemistry only covers harmful substances is laughable.

41
All about Clarinets / Re: Hard rubber conditioner
« on: January 10, 2021, 01:34:56 PM »
So what, in your opinion, constitutes a chemical?

42
All about Clarinets / Re: Hard rubber conditioner
« on: January 10, 2021, 06:04:44 AM »
Glycerine isn't "vegetable sap." It's a bi-product of making soap from animal fat or vegetable oil.  It is certainly a chemical.

43
All about Clarinets / Re: Playing in the second octave
« on: January 08, 2021, 09:46:20 AM »
It sounds like lack of support at the start of tongued notes to me.  When you play legato it seems to be going pretty much OK.

Everything - support, pressure, voicing, embouchure - needs to be in place before the note starts.  The only thing that needs to happen is the tongue moving off the reed.

Having said that, the clarion A is is a note prone to "grunting" at the best of times.  It's hard to start cleanly at pianissimo for everyone.

44
All about Clarinets / Re: In the Bleak Midwinter
« on: January 04, 2021, 02:45:19 AM »
One more thought.

I don't know whether this is the case with your instrument Larry, but a few years ago I tried a cheap Chinese clarinet and the key geometry around the A and G# key was such that I was literally unable to play it.  This was a good number of years ago and I believe Chinese instruments have improved a lot in the meantime.

45
All about Clarinets / Re: In the Bleak Midwinter
« on: January 04, 2021, 02:27:00 AM »
Good, Larry. Intonation is much better on this one.

You are picking up your L1 finger to hit the A key. The correct way is to keep your L wrist higher all the time, then with a rotation of the wrist, you can roll the finger onto the A. You'll get much smoother action using one movement instead of two.

Ref:  http://www.clarinet-now.com/clarinet-left-hand-position.html

No.  You absolutely should not rotate your wrist.  If you read the article Windy linked to you'll see that it says exactly that.  I used to do it myself many years ago and it took a lot of effort to correct.  It's a hard habit to get out of.  Of course you shouldn't "jump" the finger either.  That's probably a hard habit to get out of too.

The key is correct hand position.  It's a bit like holding a gun.  Your index finger should be curved round the A and G# keys ready to open then them with minimal movement.  You only need to move your index finger.  Moving your whole hand at the wrist is an inefficient movement and takes your other fingers away from where they will very soon need to be.  It will ultimately limit your technique. 

Do check out the article Windy linked to.  It is very good.



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