Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
 

Recent Posts

Pages: 1 ... 8 9 [10]
91
All about Clarinets / Re: Henri Dubois - Paris
« Last post by Windsong on March 07, 2024, 08:58:20 PM »
I still have my Dubois clarinet, which was what I used until getting my first of 3 R13s. Excellent clarinet -- for lamp material.....

Like this one?
(No clarinets were harmed in the making of this lamp.  I have a technique that allows it to be reversed in 5 minutes.) 😉
92
All about Clarinets / Re: Henri Dubois - Paris
« Last post by Windsong on March 07, 2024, 08:55:55 PM »
Indeed!  Thank you for posting those.

Very nice Rosewood (or is that cocobolo?) example.  That grain is just gorgeous.
93
All about Clarinets / Re: Caring for long-stored and dry grenadilla
« Last post by Windsong on March 07, 2024, 08:35:40 PM »
I echo the sentiments of those above, but caution the use of Thyme oil.  As least for me, the smell is so revolting that it drives me away for weeks.  I just have no tolerance for it.  Pure organic coconut oil has the same disinfectant properties, is equally thin, has no odor whatsoever, and you can buy it in liquid form if you look hard enough.  I do not know that it has the gumption to stand on its own as a long term bore oil, but it may.  My first oil is usually with orange oil.  I like its smell, and it is a very thin, great cleaning oil.  It is often a perfectly suitable replacement for a water bath, because of its natural cleaning properties.

However, as for washing wood, I have personally done a warm water wash on many old grenadilla clarinets I have owned, and I have never cracked one (knock wood, lol).  If you decide on a wash, I recommend a nearly dry (warm water) felt or wool swab run several times through the bore.  It will not absorb much of it.  Wash the swab every other pass, and ring it out again.  Then, take a dry swab and make several more passes.  Then, disassemble the clarinet and allow it to air-dry inside for 24 hours before oiling.  You do not want to trap moisture in the grain.
I advise this at one's own risk, of course.  If the grain is open on the clarinet, or if already cracked, you run a greater risk of the water adversely affecting the horn.  Use caution.

Almond oil is wonderful stuff.  I know professionals who thin it a hair with acetone, which I strongly disapprove of.  When I do use acetone on a clarinet, it is only to clear tenons of the last of the cork debris for good adhesion of rubber cement.  I certainly think there is no quicker way to damage a clarinet than by allowing acetone into the pores and then suspending it in oil. 

Topside, a small detail brush with soft pig hair bristles is ideal for clearing off the undesirable accumulation of time.
Cheers!
94
All about Clarinets / Re: Henri Dubois - Paris
« Last post by TMHeimer on March 07, 2024, 11:29:36 AM »
I still have my Dubois clarinet, which was what I used until getting my first of 3 R13s. Excellent clarinet -- for lamp material.....
95
Make and Model lists and research / The Fate of Pedler
« Last post by ghoulcaster on March 07, 2024, 07:15:06 AM »
oof, stumbled upon this picture. Based on the keywork, looks to be a Pedler.



96
All about Clarinets / Re: Caring for long-stored and dry grenadilla
« Last post by windydankoff on March 07, 2024, 06:45:26 AM »
First, inspect carefully for any cracks (even hairline) or chips that you may wish to fill. Dry wood will accept adhesives but once it's oiled, the cracks will be oiled too.

I would replace tenon corks first, and then oil the outside as well as inside. The best grenadilla will accept very little oil because it is naturally saturated with its own internal oil. If it absorbs very little oil and the rest just sits there, you can stop. End grain absorbs far more, watch how it absorbs inside the tone holes (assuming you'll have it disassembled.)
97
All about Clarinets / Re: Caring for long-stored and dry grenadilla
« Last post by DaveLeBlanc on March 07, 2024, 06:10:45 AM »
Sounds like it'll drink oil right up.

I would soak an old rag in pure thyme oil - this supposedly has antifungal, antibacterial, and antiviral properties, so should get rid of any germies in the bore. Run it through a few times and you've got a pretty clean bore, barring any actual soil or dirt inside. I would blow it out first with some compressed air to knock loose any cobwebs or whatever.

After that, I'd take it all apart (if you haven't already) and generously apply your oil of choice. I like almond oil myself. It will likely drink some oil, so keep applying until it's no longer thirsty. Wipe off excess and you're all set.
98
All about Clarinets / Caring for long-stored and dry grenadilla
« Last post by 350 Rocket on March 06, 2024, 06:23:58 PM »
What are the best practices for reviving wood clarinets that have been unused for a long time and seem to be very dry? Does ambient humidity have an impact? (i.e. is it detrimental to do anything in low-humidity winter conditions?)

What additional concerns are there for an instrument with a noticeably dirty bore? Is it okay to clean it first, and then oil, or is there too much risk there with immersing a dry instrument in water?

If it matters, the instruments in question are an early Normandy Special that looks like it was well-cared for but then stored for quite a while, and a Conn 424N which has not had an easy life, is very dirty, and has had a crack repaired in the past. I'm in no hurry with either so doing it right is more important than any other consideration.
99
Balance
100
Struggling re. attachments. Perhaps too large?

Pages: 1 ... 8 9 [10]