Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 

Author Topic: Wooden Saxophone Case  (Read 5358 times)

Offline bbrandha

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 285
    • View Profile
Wooden Saxophone Case
« on: July 26, 2016, 10:53:46 AM »
I know this isn't a clarinet case, but I just got this for sheer beauty. My son's alto needs a new case, so we will try it. Don't know what to do with it otherwise. Pet it?

It is extremely heavy. The zipper case is also custom.

Offline Windsong

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1190
    • View Profile
Re: Wooden Saxophone Case
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2016, 02:56:09 PM »
Oh, that's gorgious wood.  Sax, clarinet, whatever...
We all play Sax, too, I suspect.
Tell us about this aquisition.  New?  Old?  Custom?
Expert bubblegum welder, and Pedler Pedler.

Offline DaveLeBlanc

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3333
  • Clarinet-ing since 2012
    • View Profile
    • Watson Musical
Re: Wooden Saxophone Case
« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2016, 04:10:05 PM »
Might not be the best option to take to bang-around places...
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages
Irvine, California, United States

Offline bbrandha

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 285
    • View Profile
Re: Wooden Saxophone Case
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2016, 04:57:05 PM »
I was pawn shop surfing with my band director friend in Portland. We went to a new/used instrument place. The case was in their discount pile for $85. The sax plays, even if it is a cheap one. Mouthpiece, ligature, and neck strap included.I have no idea what the case could be worth.

Offline Windsong

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1190
    • View Profile
Re: Wooden Saxophone Case
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2016, 05:20:54 PM »
Wait...
The Sax was also included in the $85.00 pricetag?  I think a safe bet would be to say that you could get 200.00 for a case so finely constructed, and who knows what the sax is worth?  I could not read the stamp, but with both bell keys  (low B, Bb) on the same side of the horn, we know it was made after 1939 (unless it's a Selmer Balanced Tone-1935) and is definitely a LP Alto.
Well done...
« Last Edit: July 27, 2016, 12:43:22 PM by Windsong »
Expert bubblegum welder, and Pedler Pedler.

Offline bbrandha

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 285
    • View Profile
Re: Wooden Saxophone Case
« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2016, 06:21:59 PM »
The sax plays and I am having to switch parts in the Happy Canyon Hick Band, so I might see if in the next month I can at least learn whole notes.

Happy Canyon is the night show for our rodeo. About 1/3 of the Mounted Band also are in Hick Band. Happy Canyon was started in 1916 and was basically vaudeville with livestock. It VERY loosely portrays the history of our area. The Hick Band part is a bunch of local yokels that wander the streets trying to find an excuse to play their terrible music. I am the cymbalist. Since it is the 100th year, the Hick Band part is going back to the original fun act. Right now, we just feel kind of stupid out there.

The main Hick Band act is: The director is a showman. like a flashy drummajor. He has a whistle and directs with a toilet plunger. He calls the band to order, but the tuba can't make a sound. The director plunges the tuba and water comes out (and sometimes toilet paper and chocolate). Tries to play again. Plunges again and a bra comes out. Hooker runs from crowd, decks tuba player, and stomps off. Band plays, then realizes someone is missing. Yell and cymbalist comes out of bar or bushes, staggering drunk. Joins in at end of line, but falls in pool. Doesn't come back up, so band plays taps. Cymbalist starts up again in top of set and all is happy. (Tunnel in pool.) I don't swim, thank you much.

http://www.happycanyon.com/

Offline Windsong

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1190
    • View Profile
Re: Wooden Saxophone Case
« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2016, 07:15:50 PM »
Good gravy!  Sounds hilarious! 
Sorry I can't be there to observe...or participate!
Well, best of luck, and break a leg or two, eh?
Expert bubblegum welder, and Pedler Pedler.

Offline Silversorcerer

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1373
    • View Profile
Re: Wooden Saxophone Case
« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2016, 11:57:23 PM »
Nice. Twice nice for that price.
- Silversorcerer (David Powell) exclusively for Phil's original “The Clarinet Pages" forum

Offline bbrandha

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 285
    • View Profile
Re: Wooden Saxophone Case
« Reply #8 on: July 28, 2016, 12:02:44 PM »
My son's sax does not fit in it.

Offline DaveLeBlanc

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3333
  • Clarinet-ing since 2012
    • View Profile
    • Watson Musical
Re: Wooden Saxophone Case
« Reply #9 on: July 28, 2016, 07:16:30 PM »
Maybe he needs a different sax :)
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages
Irvine, California, United States

Offline bbrandha

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 285
    • View Profile
Re: Wooden Saxophone Case
« Reply #10 on: July 28, 2016, 07:48:37 PM »
Oh, no! He has a lovely 1930s Conn stencil that plays like a dream. I may see if I can recarve the foam padding. His sax's bell keys are on the wrong side for the case.

Offline Silversorcerer

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1373
    • View Profile
Re: Wooden Saxophone Case
« Reply #11 on: July 28, 2016, 08:38:34 PM »
My Conn C-melody sax is like that. I don't know if it makes a difference in the sound, but I think the ones with bell keys on both sides look more balanced in design. I think a minor redesign of the case padding is in order, and maybe put some wheels and a handle on that case. It's great protection but looks kind of heavy.
- Silversorcerer (David Powell) exclusively for Phil's original “The Clarinet Pages" forum

Offline DaveLeBlanc

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3333
  • Clarinet-ing since 2012
    • View Profile
    • Watson Musical
Re: Wooden Saxophone Case
« Reply #12 on: July 29, 2016, 12:45:33 AM »
Somewhere I read that c melody saxes have their bell keys on the same side to be easily differentiable from tenor saxes, which have them in opposite sides. Apparently.
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages
Irvine, California, United States

Offline Silversorcerer

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1373
    • View Profile
Re: Wooden Saxophone Case
« Reply #13 on: July 29, 2016, 07:47:05 AM »
The Conn and the Holton both have bell keys on opposite sides, and this is a function of when they were built and a feature common to most of the early saxes I have seen whether these were tenor, C-melody or alto. I haven't been making a careful study of it, but this appears to be the case regardless of who made them.

The easiest way to tell a C-melody from a tenor in a photo is that the bell is narrower on a C melody and it sort of has a "slim" look to it compared to the alto and tenor models. There are also fatter C-tenor models (rare) that were built for orchestra use, but I don't think many orchestras really used them. I've only seen those in photos so far. It seems redundant for there to be both C-tenors and C-melodies, but at the time the C-melody was built when (before amplification was common) saxophones of full dimension were very loud compared to other instruments. The C-melody is slimmer because they wanted to "tone it down" for use in chamber music with instruments that could not be as loud.

So now all these sax players experimenting with resurrecting C-melody instruments are expecting the projection they get from altos and tenors. Mostly the Cs get upgraded resonator (hard) pads with metal domes or resonator pads. I think it makes the instruments tonally uneven. The original pads for these were soft as pillows. I salvaged a handful of the original pads off the Holton and one of the better USA pad makers will make me an original type set if I send them an example pad to copy. I thought that was pretty bonus to find a company that will do that for a reasonable price. So that's the goal for my jigsaw puzzle Holton C-melody. It's destined for the way-back machine restoration route, which should give me a very mellow less aggressive saxophone in C. For my current performance situations, that will be a big plus. I never realized how loud saxophones can be until I played one. These truly do not need amplification at all.
- Silversorcerer (David Powell) exclusively for Phil's original “The Clarinet Pages" forum

Offline andybeals

  • Proud alto clarinetist
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 299
  • Hi, my name is Andy and I have a Clarinet Problem
    • View Profile
Re: Wooden Saxophone Case
« Reply #14 on: July 29, 2016, 02:17:33 PM »
Yes, LOUD saxes!  That might be the very cause of my embouchure problem on saxes - I have a hard time getting good steady notes and tend to play in the second octave unless I very carefully approach the mouthpiece and I certainly don't want to make a Bad Sound.  On the soprano, I need to double-lip the mouthpiece, and even then it's tough.

Clarinets are something else - when I picked the soprano and the bass back up, they just came to me.  During a performance, I can switch alto/bass/contra alto easily enough between pieces.  We had a pep band gig scheduled on the first of our spring concert days, so on the last day of April this year, I played Bb soprano in the morning and alto/bass/contra-alto in the evening. 
The Clarinet Pages is where we answer the question: "Am I not a Clarinet and a Woodwind?"