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Author Topic: Funky kidney bean key touches...  (Read 5576 times)

Offline Windsong

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Funky kidney bean key touches...
« on: August 27, 2016, 08:11:09 AM »
I have a late 1940s Noblet stencil (Jeffrey) soprano Bb, and it's a marvelous horn.  It has many of the finest noblet features of the time, and very well selected and extremely dense grenadilla.  It's one of my best players, certainly.
Until yesterday, I had never seen another clarinet with the odd LH5 key touches.  They are not fluid, as on a Noblet or Leblanc, and were tacked in place after the the key mechanisms were forged.

Have a look:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/LEBLANC-USA-ALTO-CLARINET-MADE-FOR-WURLITZER-CO-NEEDS-OVERHAUL-NOT-PLAYABLE/262594707130?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D38846%26meid%3Db29607763db1441f94947559956fa367%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D2%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D262594597615

And now mine:




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Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Funky kidney bean key touches...
« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2016, 11:10:14 AM »
I've seen that on several Vito Resotone soprano clarinets 3 Vito Resotone basses, and even a Normandy 8 (pictured).

It seems to me, that this was often done on Vito Resotone models, for some reason. Other Vito models did not have this.  I'm not sure when the Normandy 8 was made, but perhaps this was a thing that was unique to the time period.

 
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Offline Silversorcerer

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Re: Funky kidney bean key touches...
« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2016, 11:37:07 AM »
Interesting key details for sure. I think I remember seeing that type of touch on a few others, perhaps early German systems? I could be confused. That could be a way to positive ID a stencil with a few more matching details.

In any case that alto could be on the Honest Seller thread:

Quote
KEEP IN MIND THAT YOU MUST REPLACE ALL PADS IF YOU’RE GOING TO PLAY THIS ONE!

In our opinion, the value of the instrument is probably below the costs to do a proper full restoration.

BUT…. If you don’t mind how it looks and if you want to pad it yourself, it’s A BARGAIN.

 NO WARRANTY NO WARRANTY NO WARRANTY!

Witchita Band probably knows what he's talking about.
- Silversorcerer (David Powell) exclusively for Phil's original “The Clarinet Pages" forum

Offline Windsong

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Re: Funky kidney bean key touches...
« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2016, 12:43:30 PM »
The kidney beans are kinda ugly, IMO, but very touch friendly.  As large as they are, they are hard to miss on a fast passage, while not being difficult to accurately engage.
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Offline Windsong

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Re: Funky kidney bean key touches...
« Reply #4 on: August 27, 2016, 12:49:08 PM »
I've seen that on several Vito Resotone soprano clarinets 3 Vito Resotone basses, and even a Normandy 8 (pictured).

It seems to me, that this was often done on Vito Resotone models, for some reason. Other Vito models did not have this.  I'm not sure when the Normandy 8 was made, but perhaps this was a thing that was unique to the time period.

Dave,
That's a very good emulation of this one, but that Normandy is much newer than my Jeffrey, as all early Normandies were resonite.  In 1964, they began to be made of wood as well, if memory serves.
Does that Normandy have 3 or 4 posts for the RH trills?
Thanks for sharing that.
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Offline andybeals

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Re: Funky kidney bean key touches...
« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2016, 12:51:01 PM »
Wichita Band is where the contra alto I'm playing on originated and it's a thing of beauty.

I agree that Wichita Band knows what they're talking about.  Watched their auctions of gorgeous clarinets.  Drooled over their website.  They are on my list of places to go should I ever find myself with lottery winnings. 

If I were you, I'd gather my notes and make sure that they're in the case, somewhere, in the event it's not you that's selling the clarinet at some point in the future. 

One of the things that I like about this group is that we're more akin to guardians of our instruments, as we play them for now, but know that someone else will be playing them in the future. 
The Clarinet Pages is where we answer the question: "Am I not a Clarinet and a Woodwind?"

Offline Windsong

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Re: Funky kidney bean key touches...
« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2016, 12:58:48 PM »
Well said, indeed.
They might be our property now, but as it stands, we probably all treat our instruments well enough that they will surely outlast us, barring anything catastrophic, like a fire.
That brings me to a question:
Do any of you have a revolving codicil for your instruments?  Because inventory changes on a whim, mine would have to be easily updatable...
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Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Funky kidney bean key touches...
« Reply #7 on: August 27, 2016, 02:20:47 PM »
I've seen that on several Vito Resotone soprano clarinets 3 Vito Resotone basses, and even a Normandy 8 (pictured).

It seems to me, that this was often done on Vito Resotone models, for some reason. Other Vito models did not have this.  I'm not sure when the Normandy 8 was made, but perhaps this was a thing that was unique to the time period.

Dave,
That's a very good emulation of this one, but that Normandy is much newer than my Jeffrey, as all early Normandies were resonite.  In 1964, they began to be made of wood as well, if memory serves.
Does that Normandy have 3 or 4 posts for the RH trills?
Thanks for sharing that.
I'm really not sure, I only have a few pictures of that clarinet from several years ago and I forget!  I think it was 4, but I'm getting cross-eyed trying to figure it out from the picture...
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages
Irvine, California, United States

Offline Windsong

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Re: Funky kidney bean key touches...
« Reply #8 on: August 27, 2016, 03:34:08 PM »
Well, it is IS similar to mine.  Not identical, but very close...
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Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Funky kidney bean key touches...
« Reply #9 on: August 27, 2016, 05:14:25 PM »
Well said, indeed.
They might be our property now, but as it stands, we probably all treat our instruments well enough that they will surely outlast us, barring anything catastrophic, like a fire.
That brings me to a question:
Do any of you have a revolving codicil for your instruments?  Because inventory changes on a whim, mine would have to be easily updatable...
I operate on the principle of "everything's for sale".  For the most part, with the exception of my Noblet Stubbins, Kohlert Alto, and Moennig bass, everything else is liquid.  I used to want to keep everything, but honestly - why?
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Irvine, California, United States

Offline Windsong

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Re: Funky kidney bean key touches...
« Reply #10 on: August 27, 2016, 09:11:39 PM »
We keep the ones that move us, and stir within us a sense of something quite remarkable and individually unique. They beg us to push the limits, but complement us each step of the way...
These are often no-name or stencil instruments, perhaps even a hodgepodge of random, recycled parts thrown together with "aftermarket precision"; regardless, they move our souls. 
The rest are currency that we improve with our care, precision, experimentation, and respect.
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Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Offline Windsong

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Re: Funky kidney bean key touches...
« Reply #12 on: August 28, 2016, 06:15:53 AM »
Fascinating.  That one is a "Jeuffroy", whereas mine is a "Jeffrey".  That serial number is also in 171000s, while mine is very low, in the 3000s.  Keywork of the one you show is also more traditionally "Leblanc" without scallops in the trills, whereas mine are scallopped.  Also, for the second time in less than 24 hours, I see a clarinet with a nickel capped lower joint tenon, and no other caps. 
I'm glad you posted that, but I'm afraid it raises more questions than it answers!
Did they change their spelling to something more French sounding?  Are they even related?  (I have to think so, as those key touches seem almost patentable, and certainly identical.)  Why did they change the rest of the keywork?
 ;D
« Last Edit: August 28, 2016, 06:39:54 AM by Windsong »
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Offline Silversorcerer

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Offline Windsong

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Re: Funky kidney bean key touches...
« Reply #14 on: August 31, 2016, 06:27:23 PM »
By golly; there they are again!
I originally got the tip on the BB from a certain prominent poster who plays only high end LeBlancs professionally that mine was a Leblanc stencil, and from another poster that the serial number was circa 1947, so I feel confident that this was the only company to ever use these key touches, as they are too unique to copy without fear of direct infringement.  I actually think these were Noblet stencils--not LeBlancs, per-se.
This week, we've seen two more.
Now, I'd like to know when they first used them, and for how long and on which models they were used.
Thank you very much for sharing the link.
Curious and ugly they are, but my blind fingers think they are beautiful.
« Last Edit: August 31, 2016, 06:39:32 PM by Windsong »
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