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Author Topic: Vintage Ullmann leipzig clarinet hinge pins  (Read 5576 times)

Offline abellows

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Re: Vintage Ullmann leipzig clarinet hinge pins
« Reply #15 on: September 19, 2016, 06:23:44 PM »
I thought I would show everyone what the Muriatic acid does after 3 minutes. You can see the original condition of the keys in my first progress pic on my prior post.  All I did was put the keys in the mixture and stirred them a bit. It gives them a matte finish but removes almost all of the gunk. If you wanted them matte just hit them with a toothbrush with a bit of baking soda with water( a paste). I could post some pics of what they look like with different grits of diamond paste, which is really cheap on ebay. If anyone is interested in seeing the difference in glossiness. I think I got 12 different grits in plastic syringes for less that $20 from china.

For the acid mix I use pool acid and tap water. Always add Acid to the water not water to Acid, and wear appropriate safety equipment!!!!!

Offline Windsong

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Re: Vintage Ullmann leipzig clarinet hinge pins
« Reply #16 on: September 19, 2016, 07:32:42 PM »
Would you be so kind as to share your formulaic mix?  (% wise, regarding acid to water).
Expert bubblegum welder, and Pedler Pedler.

Offline abellows

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Re: Vintage Ullmann leipzig clarinet hinge pins
« Reply #17 on: September 19, 2016, 07:57:02 PM »
oops I knew I forgot something lol. Its about 50/50.  I also forgot to mention that on the posts I just use a Q-tip and swab carefully around them, although a tiny paintbrush might work better. then just swab with a Q-tip and water to neutralize the acid and wipe with a paper towel. I haven't had any issues where small amounts of the acid make contact with the wood. I also haven't tried it on anything but a wooden body, so might want to test a hidden area on a plastic body.

Here is a link to the diamond paste. I purchased it to sharpen Wood plane blades with leater strips. ITs amazing stuff!!

http://www.ebay.com/itm/12pc-5g-Polishing-Lapping-Paste-Compound-Syringes-W40-W0-5-Grit-320-to-10000/252435186914?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D38530%26meid%3D014362af900442179be578ab32e64a62%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D2%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D311686196616

Offline Silversorcerer

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Re: Vintage Ullmann leipzig clarinet hinge pins
« Reply #18 on: September 19, 2016, 08:27:14 PM »
Great information! Thank-you for the very thorough explanation.  I have generally been getting the keys pretty good looking, but not by any kind of systematic efficient process. Elbow grease, as Dave said, was probably my primary approach to most key cleaning.

There is a different approach that I like if the keys are silver or silver plated that avoids abrasives altogether, which is easy to find the method if you look for silver tarnish, aluminum, and baking soda. That method reverses silver tarnish instead of removing it. It converts the tarnish back to pure silver by an electrolytic bath. It only works with silver and silver plate, but it's a great trick to know about if you have some heavily tarnished plated keys and don't want to lose the plating removing the tarnish.
- Silversorcerer (David Powell) exclusively for Phil's original “The Clarinet Pages" forum

Offline abellows

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Re: Vintage Ullmann leipzig clarinet hinge pins
« Reply #19 on: September 20, 2016, 07:38:55 PM »
I have tried the baking soda with aluminum foil with great success. Most recently I did a piccolo and it turned out great.

I thought I would attach some pics of three clarinets that I had out that show a machine polish (far left) machine polish 3 years later(middle) and a hand polish with 1 micron paste. All were pre cleaned in the acid solution.

Also the one too the left is the Ullmann that I just finished. I am just waiting on the pads to arrive from Prestini, I ordered the tan Roo Pads.

Offline Silversorcerer

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Re: Vintage Ullmann leipzig clarinet hinge pins
« Reply #20 on: September 21, 2016, 09:45:46 AM »
The machine+3years and the hand polish look very similar to me in these photos and also look best to my eye. Others might prefer the fresh jewelry quality of the machine polish. Regarding authenticity, it is difficult to know just how polished these were originally, but I think it is safe to assume that these were polished as well as the technology allowed, and even very old technology allowed for very fine polishing of metals. It's most plausible that a new clarinet that is now old originally had keys that were polished to jewelers' perfection.

I am also a fan of the Prestini pads. I've used their pads on clarinets and also on that antique Bettoney bassoon and have been very pleased with them. I like having a choice of thicknesses that allow me to get the pads seated level with about the same amount of pad showing all the way around the cup. That also allows a pad to be seated deep into the cup in more cases. A thin layer of adhesive is generally a stronger bond than a thick layer. Getting the regulation of synchronized keys is easier to do if you can choose the ideal pad thickness and setting the clearances is also easier.
- Silversorcerer (David Powell) exclusively for Phil's original “The Clarinet Pages" forum