Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 

Author Topic: Should I?  (Read 5365 times)

Offline bbrandha

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 285
    • View Profile
Should I?
« on: October 07, 2016, 08:24:12 PM »

Offline DaveLeBlanc

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3333
  • Clarinet-ing since 2012
    • View Profile
    • Watson Musical
Re: Should I?
« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2016, 09:23:47 PM »
$150 for a Propeller clarinet is a VERY good deal.  Do it!
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages
Irvine, California, United States

Offline bbrandha

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 285
    • View Profile
Re: Should I?
« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2016, 10:17:06 PM »
I figured I'd find an enabler!

Offline Silversorcerer

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1373
    • View Profile
Re: Should I?
« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2016, 06:01:07 AM »
By all means, scoop that deal!  :)  Understand it is mostly an investment in a collectible clarinet, not necessarily the best playing or sounding clarinet out there, but probably good enough to use in performance, and less finicky to the weather than solid wood.

Do it fast, too. Once that cat is out of the bag, someone might offer higher after seeing this thread. I hope it's already a done deal.
- Silversorcerer (David Powell) exclusively for Phil's original “The Clarinet Pages" forum

Offline bbrandha

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 285
    • View Profile
Re: Should I?
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2016, 06:09:13 AM »
It is mine!

Offline Airflyte

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 879
  • CONNoisseur of Vintage Ebonite
    • View Profile
Re: Should I?
« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2016, 07:19:40 AM »
Congrats!  That was on my "watch" list too!
"The Clarinet - in a class of its own"

Visit Phil Pedler's Clarinet Pages NEW website!
https://sites.google.com/clarinetpages.net/clarinetpages

Offline bbrandha

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 285
    • View Profile
Re: Should I?
« Reply #6 on: October 13, 2016, 05:02:18 PM »
It is here. No wear, good pads, and plays fine. It is a bit tarnished and dusty, but otherwise like new!

No, I am not planning on playing it, but it's nice that it does.

Offline Windsong

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1190
    • View Profile
Re: Should I?
« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2016, 05:25:09 PM »
Play it!  An unplayed clarinet is an unhappy clarinet.  It might be a collector's item, but you should at least put it through its paces, now and again.  (You can't hurt it!)
Expert bubblegum welder, and Pedler Pedler.

Offline bbrandha

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 285
    • View Profile
Re: Should I?
« Reply #8 on: October 14, 2016, 08:48:27 PM »
Unfortunately, I do not have the time or desire to keep all of my clarinets exercised properly. My horse doesn't get out much, either.

Offline bbrandha

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 285
    • View Profile
Re: Should I?
« Reply #9 on: November 01, 2016, 08:24:39 PM »
I took it to play in youth symphony practice tonight. Um... it could be my favorite. In tune, pretty much, very free-blowing, and comfy for my hands. I switched to my Selmer Paris K Series (My, I sound pretentious!) halfway through and it is not nearly as comfortable for my hands. The Conn has wider rings that lie level with the tone hole. The Selmer 's rings are a bit higher, forcing the pads of my fingers in to plug the hole.

I have a question. The Conn is a student model, I assume made for small hands. The Selmer was made in 1929 or 30 for a pro. At that time, there would have been very few women playing at that level. Therefore, it must be designed for a man's hands. Do you think that is true or do you think it is just a design difference for some other reason?

Offline Windsong

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1190
    • View Profile
Re: Should I?
« Reply #10 on: November 06, 2016, 01:57:12 PM »
I have very broad hands, so and your postulation would have never crossed my mind, but I believe you are spot on.  I suspect there were very few women playing at that time, and I have to believe that the size of a woman's finger pads were never taken into consideration.


Expert bubblegum welder, and Pedler Pedler.

Offline bbrandha

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 285
    • View Profile
Re: Should I?
« Reply #11 on: November 14, 2016, 03:59:22 PM »
By the way, I got it back out and it is plastic. I wondered why it was so cold! I couldn't tell for sure until I looked at the tone holes. I am still not sure about the barrel and bell. The barrel has a crack on the outside. It is a very real looking grain.

Offline Silversorcerer

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1373
    • View Profile
Re: Should I?
« Reply #12 on: November 21, 2016, 11:37:52 AM »
I think what you might be looking at is pad thickness on the Selmer. If you have thicker pads, the rings will sit up high, sometimes too high. The best solution is thinner pads and altering the set-up and cork shims to accommodate thinner pads. If one has broader fingertips, the rings need to lay level with the tone hole tops. Narrower fingertips might do better with rings that are slightly elevated. I don't think one or the other is better or worse in terms of ergonomics, but how these are set up makes a difference.

When I was in marching band (late 60s), most of the clarinetists were women. I don't think the makers took gender into consideration. They might have taken age into consideration. I know student Bettoney clarinets have keys specifically shaped for smaller hands (Cadet models), but it's not the ring keys.

The toneholes might have plastic inserts or more likely hard rubber inserts, but the material is laminated wood. I am about 99.99999999% certain of that. At the time these were made, plastics were not widely used for anything.
- Silversorcerer (David Powell) exclusively for Phil's original “The Clarinet Pages" forum

Offline bbrandha

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 285
    • View Profile
Re: Should I?
« Reply #13 on: November 21, 2016, 06:31:25 PM »
Yep on the Conn. The tone holes are plastic of some sort. The rest is wood.