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Author Topic: Clarionet versus Clarinet  (Read 1416 times)

Offline Windsong

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Clarionet versus Clarinet
« on: July 27, 2017, 10:38:54 PM »
Does anyone have an account of when the United States, or perhaps English-speaking countries in general, disposed of the "o" in the spelling of the "clarionet"?
I recently found this 1876 advert, and found it interesting:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/1876-ADVERT-Paillard-Music-Box-Boxes-680-Broadway-New-York-Berteling-Musical-/311416663603?hash=item4881e12e33:g:mHwAAOSwMmBVwMfq
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Offline Dibbs

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Re: Clarionet versus Clarinet
« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2017, 01:46:57 AM »
The google ngram tool is useful for studying questions like this.

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=clarionet%2C+clarinet&year_start=1700&year_end=2000&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Cclarionet%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cclarinet%3B%2Cc0

It looks like "clarinet" became the more popular form around 1895 and
"clarionet" declined steadily with usage becoming negligible by about 1950.

Looking at a 1760 to 1820 is interesting

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=clarionet%2Cclarinet&year_start=1760&year_end=1820&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Cclarionet%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cclarinet%3B%2Cc0

it looks like "clarinet" was the first form, presumably after the German "Klarinette" and "clarionet" is first used in 1778 becoming the more popular form after 1812.

Offline LarryS

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Re: Clarionet versus Clarinet
« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2017, 02:10:47 AM »
I don't think I've ever heard the word clarionet before, even tho part of the clarinet's range is called clarion.
I believe clarion is an old name for trumpet (clarion call etc) and therefore clarinet means little trumpet.
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Offline Windsong

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Re: Clarionet versus Clarinet
« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2017, 01:54:36 PM »
Good sleuthing, Dibbs.
Thanks for that.
Rather curious, indeed.
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Offline Dibbs

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Re: Clarionet versus Clarinet
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2017, 01:57:56 AM »
I don't think I've ever heard the word clarionet before, even tho part of the clarinet's range is called clarion.
I believe clarion is an old name for trumpet (clarion call etc) and therefore clarinet means little trumpet.

I can remember occasionally hearing "old" people using the word when I was a kid. I'm 60 now.