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Author Topic: Playing in the second octave  (Read 796 times)

Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Playing in the second octave
« Reply #15 on: January 18, 2021, 02:45:32 PM »
In terms of mouthpieces, the Geo M Bundy 3 can be found for about $20 or less, and it's GOLD. Most people won't really need anything better unless they're going pro.
$20? That must be a typo...
Here's one for $20 + $5 shipping. It's a great practice piece for sure.
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages
Irvine, California, United States

Offline Airflyte

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Re: Playing in the second octave
« Reply #16 on: January 20, 2021, 03:19:34 PM »
I guess you could get something for $20. Last time I looked the upline mouthpieces were like $80-$100. But like ligatures, they all play. As long as you get one that allows you to get all the "normal" notes (ie. not double high C....), stick with that. Then get quite good and go through the phase of trying everything under the sun. Then find one you like and stick with it forever (life is too short). I've used 2 mouthpieces since 1975 and they play almost identically.

Good advice. Paying more than $75 for a good playing mouth piece may be nothing more than diminished returns.
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Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Playing in the second octave
« Reply #17 on: January 21, 2021, 11:07:13 AM »
I guess you could get something for $20. Last time I looked the upline mouthpieces were like $80-$100. But like ligatures, they all play. As long as you get one that allows you to get all the "normal" notes (ie. not double high C....), stick with that. Then get quite good and go through the phase of trying everything under the sun. Then find one you like and stick with it forever (life is too short). I've used 2 mouthpieces since 1975 and they play almost identically.

Good advice. Paying more than $75 for a good playing mouth piece may be nothing more than diminished returns.
I agree very much. I mean you can get mouthpiece of absolute perfection for $100. Or spend $20, or $50, for one that is 90-95% as good.
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages
Irvine, California, United States