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Author Topic: NEWBIE REPAIR QUERY  (Read 435 times)

Offline jdbassplayer

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Re: NEWBIE REPAIR QUERY
« Reply #15 on: March 02, 2021, 06:19:59 PM »
Yamaha 26s are always 3/64” or under though. The only way the cork would need to be thicker is if someone shaved the plastic down, in which case OP should probably have the tenon replaced as now that would be a weak spot. But that’s a very unlikely situation.

If you have problems getting the right thickness I would highly recommend a good set of calipers. You can wrap the cork around the tenon and compress it a bit with the calipers to get a good estimate of what the compressed diameter will be. Using this method I’ve never had to replace a cork because I used the wrong size.

Offline windydankoff

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Re: NEWBIE REPAIR QUERY
« Reply #16 on: March 02, 2021, 08:18:13 PM »
I was just going to suggest using a caliper. I've been using a Hbr Freight $20 digital caliper for 10 years.

One time my only cork sheet was too thin. I glued card paper around the tenon groove, then the cork, and it came out fine.
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Offline Dibbs

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Re: NEWBIE REPAIR QUERY
« Reply #17 on: March 03, 2021, 04:16:44 AM »
I guess it's ordered by now so, since you are going to be doing quite a lot of sanding, you may want a bench peg as well.  It holds the clarinet between your belly and the bench and makes sanding the corks quite a bit easier and quicker.

Be careful not to sand the wood of the tenon.  That leads to wobbly joints.

Offline Andy Mac

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Re: NEWBIE REPAIR QUERY
« Reply #18 on: March 04, 2021, 08:41:57 AM »
No, nothing has been ordered yet, I've had some medical issues.
I'll likely order the cork today.
I'm going to try to make a bench peg to use.

Offline Dibbs

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Re: NEWBIE REPAIR QUERY
« Reply #19 on: March 04, 2021, 11:53:34 AM »
Excellent.  I've got a lathe so making a bench peg was quite easy.  Maybe an electric drill in a vice could serve as a makeshift lathe.  I've done equally crazy things in the past but be careful.  Power tools and lash-ups like that aren't very compatible with health and safety.

Offline Windsong

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Re: NEWBIE REPAIR QUERY
« Reply #20 on: March 10, 2021, 08:03:27 PM »
Even if you are only going to re-cork tenons occasionally, it really is a good idea to have a good supply of just about every cork thickness, and then you do not have to compromise.  One clarinet typically needs more than one size to recork all tenons.  I would rather sit for an unnecessary root canal than sand down cork, because I used too thick a size.  Truly, I find it so laborious and unnecessary.  My recommendation is to buy a kit from either Music Medic or Instrument Clinic, as they are both great. 
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Offline Andy Mac

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Re: NEWBIE REPAIR QUERY
« Reply #21 on: March 11, 2021, 10:58:14 AM »
I thought of getting a kit but just couldn't really afford one. 
I'll keep an eye out for used kits/tools.
I've ordered the cork so will see how I make out...
Thanks for all your input.

Offline philpedler

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Re: NEWBIE REPAIR QUERY
« Reply #22 on: March 14, 2021, 06:04:42 PM »
What a helpful thread, you guys! Fantastic replies.

I didn't see my advice for someone on a tight budget:
Get any kind of waxed dental tape or dental floss. Wrap the tenon joint as neatly as you can. A thicker kind of thread will also work and cotton thread was used on 18th century clarinets. I like dental tape better. THEN when you have wound enough on to be an easy fit, finish off by wrapping that layer of winding with Teflon plumbers tape (available at any hardware store). Any time the joint becomes loose, just add a little more Teflon tape. This is cheap and can last forever.

Offline Dibbs

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Re: NEWBIE REPAIR QUERY
« Reply #23 on: March 15, 2021, 09:18:31 AM »
If you are going to use thread you should wax it with beeswax.  Silk or linen thread can be used as an alternative to cotton.  As with everything on musical instruments, different people swear by different materials.  Also some early instrument makers recommend random wrapping rather than neat spirals.