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Author Topic: jean paul clarinet  (Read 1574 times)

Offline pl

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jean paul clarinet
« on: January 24, 2022, 10:02:53 AM »
Hello everyone. I am new here.  I played clarinet all through school and was very good.  My mom (raised in Depression Era) knew someone who needed one and gave mine away when I was gone to college..ugh...yes she did.    I've recently had some time off work following a car accident and wanted to take it back up.  I bought a Jean Paul Clarinet (300) from Amazon (not wanting to invest a whole lot and see how it went).  I remember so much more than I ever thought I would. However, it is very hard to blow. It is wearing me out.  I've tried adjusting my embouchere and I'm thinking it could be the stock mouthpiece that came with it; I don't know.
I'm playing with a 2.5 Rico reed and the tone is good, but I'm exhausted.
Any help would be greatly appreciated.  And yeah, I know buying one from Amazon not a great idea as I thought about returning the whole thing but my mouthpiece is already rather scratched up.

Offline jdbassplayer

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Re: jean paul clarinet
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2022, 10:19:39 AM »
If a Rico 2.5 feels stuffy that's a big problem...

First I would try a new mouthpiece since you should always upgrade that anyway and you can use them with any clarinet. I like the Fobes Debut. If that doesn't help look for a refurbished Vito or Yamaha, you can get them for $150-$250. It's not worth having your Jean Paul repaired as the pads they use tend to fail quickly anyway.

Offline windydankoff

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Re: jean paul clarinet
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2022, 10:37:58 AM »
Good chance the clarinet is OK. The stock Chinese mouthpieces are typically of good classic design and if you're lucky, the reed facing is aligned right. Otherwise, it's a door stop. You don't know until you compare.

The 2.5 reed is too hard for beginning. Natural reeds are so inconsistent, I suggest instead to get a Fibracell 1.5 synthetic, also from Amazon (or Weiner). It will last you for many months, with no soaking or warping.

So first step - the reed. If that isn't wonderful enough, then try a different MP. Yamaha 4C is a cheap favorite, or take JD's advice. Or, get a Sumner Acousticut 3 (vintage) often found on auction for $50 or more, and consistent!
Windy at BLACK • HOLE Clarinets
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Offline pl

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Re: jean paul clarinet
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2022, 10:51:43 AM »
Thank you.  I will try a different reed first and then go to mouthpiece next if that doesn't help.
I appreciate your help.   

Offline philpedler

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Re: jean paul clarinet
« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2022, 02:48:09 PM »
Heavens! I totally disagree that a 2.5 reed is too hard. One has to figure in that my friend Windy has jaw problems, as he himself freely admits. Windy, I never suggest less than a 2.5 reed for beginners who have normal jaws.

One pad up at the top of the clarinet not seating well will make the whole clarinet play stuffy. Sounds like you got a used clarinet. It could have MANY problems. I would suggest finding some student in a Jr. High school who can verify that his/her clarinet plays well. Then sterilize the mouthpieces and switch clarinets and switch mouthpieces. (I know. I'm out of date. If you like, wear a mask while testing!)

Try a suction test on each joint of your clarinet. If you close all the holes and the bottom bore and suck all the air out of the clarinet (like sucking all the air out of a bottle), how long will it hold the suction?



Offline pl

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Re: jean paul clarinet
« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2022, 08:25:59 PM »
Well, if I'm understanding your test and performing it correctly, it seems that it is holding pretty well.  I'm not finding any leaks, but I'm new at all of this of course.
It is a new clarinet.  It is a Jean Paul clarinet, probably not the greatest brand, but yes, it is actually brand new. 
I did switch out to a 2.0 Rico reed from the 2.5 I was using (one came with the clarinet) but I really can't tell any difference in ease to play with that switch. 


Offline Airflyte

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Re: jean paul clarinet
« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2022, 06:56:02 AM »
A new Jean Paul is a good clarinet. 
"The Clarinet - in a class of its own"

Visit Phil Pedler's Clarinet Pages NEW website!
https://sites.google.com/clarinetpages.net/clarinetpages

Offline pl

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Re: jean paul clarinet
« Reply #7 on: January 25, 2022, 11:02:07 AM »
Oh good!  Thank you!

Offline Windsong

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Re: jean paul clarinet
« Reply #8 on: January 25, 2022, 07:30:21 PM »
I have been pleased with 2.5 reeds.  I am an old geezer, and have found, until recently, that they were best for what I play.  I have recently begun using fibracells, as well, and I think I actually rather prefer 3 reeds, now.  When I took clarinet back up 7 years back, I started with a 2 Reed, and that was best for me at the time.  Experiment.  We are all different.  I cannot use any Reed beyond a 3, or I get exhausted, as well.  One's Reed and mouthpiece (assuming the clarinet seals well, and is adjusted correctly, of course) are by far the most important mechanical components of a horn, for playing satisfaction.  Technique is equally important, but that returns in time.  Since you were good, you can be again.
Cheers.
Expert bubblegum welder, and Pedler Pedler.

Offline pl

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Re: jean paul clarinet
« Reply #9 on: January 25, 2022, 07:41:02 PM »
Thank you so much!  You have no idea how much that encouragement means to me! 
Can I ask you about mouthpieces?  I am trying to choose between a vandoren b45, yamaha 4c, or J&D Hite Premiere.  I don't know if I can try them out yet or not.

Offline Windsong

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Re: jean paul clarinet
« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2022, 09:24:45 PM »
The Hite is a student trinket (I know I will get flak for that comment) because it is a very neutral piece, and good for not sounding terrible.  If a MP's greatest claim to fame it not scaring off the novice, then it excels tremendously.  I know nothing of the Yamaha piece.  The Vandoren B45 is typically excellent.  If you purchase one new, it will be excellent.  If you take your chances on a used one, you may be dissatisfied if it needs to be refaced. They are great for classical and jazz, alike, but more warmly regarded among the jazz crowd.
I love my Selmer HS* and my Woodwind Co. Robert Marcellus #3.  I focus on these now.  Experiment to find the one capable of a sound that imbues you with confidence.
Expert bubblegum welder, and Pedler Pedler.

Offline pl

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Re: jean paul clarinet
« Reply #11 on: January 31, 2022, 04:41:34 PM »
You are the second person that has mentioned the Selmer HS now....and I hadn't heard of that one.
I just want to be able to play without it taking so much out of me, as I then put the instrument away at that point.
I don't think it is leaking anywhere as I've done several leak tests on it (suction, paper under pads, etc).

Offline Windsong

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Re: jean paul clarinet
« Reply #12 on: February 01, 2022, 07:48:45 PM »
If you can find an HS*, grab it.  They are as rare as hen's teeth, and for good reason.  A good player is an absolute gem.  Tight enough to articulate well, but open enough to bend your notes. 
These sultry pieces are accomodating and agreeable.
Expert bubblegum welder, and Pedler Pedler.