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Author Topic: Typical articulated C#/G# tenon?  (Read 1640 times)

Offline Windsong

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Typical articulated C#/G# tenon?
« on: October 31, 2023, 08:43:47 AM »
This is a late 1930s unicorn Pedler, and my first articulated tenon cork replacement.  I was fascinated to find that extra meat has been left around the tone hole, perhaps to help prevent cracking.

My, what a fun cork this will be to cut!

Has anyone seen this tenon manufacturing technique?
« Last Edit: October 31, 2023, 08:59:19 PM by Windsong »
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Offline Windsong

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Re: Typical articulated C#/G# tenon?
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2023, 11:30:26 AM »
We'll see how long it lasts!
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Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Typical articulated C#/G# tenon?
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2023, 12:02:12 PM »
How neat. I have never seen that before. It does make sense to prevent cracking. Many of the articulates I've been through have had at least hairlines. One drop and it's over. I'm sure the extra beef makes a difference.

How did you manage to cut it, if I may ask? Asking for a friend...
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages
Virginia Beach, Virginia

Offline Windsong

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Re: Typical articulated C#/G# tenon?
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2023, 06:16:10 AM »
I appreciate you chiming in Dave, as I know you have some experience with these in general.  It did, indeed seem a sensible idea for durability.

I cut the cork as I would ordinarily, and then I measured the "box" (10mm in one direction and 11 mm in the other), took a mechanical pencil to lightly scribe my rudimentary cuts, and then I used a small Xacto blade to open up the box.   I test fit, and made subtle modifications until it straddled the box well enough to hold seal.  It took me three tries, (and the photo above is of attempt #2, as the cork was a hair too loose), and the top portion of the cork above the box is only 2mm deep (wide?) so I anticipate having to revisit this with greater frequency than a typical cork. 
« Last Edit: November 08, 2023, 06:20:10 AM by Windsong »
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Offline Windsong

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Re: Typical articulated C#/G# tenon?
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2023, 06:55:29 AM »
This Pedler has some other features that I've not seen on other Brands--especially from this 1938-1941 time period.

I admire all the adjustments, and am sure they provide value to a tech (or handy player) willing to fiddle and fine tune, but often--less is more.  This is an unrestored player, with light, quick response.  Note also the key wear.  While not abused, she's been no Curio Cabinet Queen these last 80+ years.  Very similar in feel to a Penzel Mueller Artist.  Note the beveled ring keys which prompt speed, akin to Artist models.
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Offline LarryS

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Re: Typical articulated C#/G# tenon?
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2023, 01:54:16 PM »
What is the purpose of such a tenon? Looks bizarre
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Offline Windsong

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Re: Typical articulated C#/G# tenon?
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2023, 07:09:55 PM »
Some would call ot a liability.  Truth be told, most professionals play traditional 17/6 configured clarinets.

it's "advantage" is space savings, for the addition of one more sliver actuator for alternate fingering of the C#/G# note.

As a general rule, I love complex, well-engineered mechanisms, if for no other reason than marveling at the genius of the human mind.

Note this additional sliver key on the LJ.  You will find that non-articulated clarinets do not possess this:
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Offline modernicus

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Re: Typical articulated C#/G# tenon?
« Reply #7 on: November 11, 2023, 09:55:43 AM »
Yep, common way these were made.  Nice job, these are a pain.  I have an A like this that needs work on the cork and has unfortunately cracked around the metal lined socket this particular instrument has on the lower joint.
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Offline Windsong

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Re: Typical articulated C#/G# tenon?
« Reply #8 on: November 11, 2023, 04:16:12 PM »
Thanks.  Admittedly, I am not in love with, nor do I find a fingering advantage to this setup.  I am sure there are those who could not feel whole without it.
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Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Typical articulated C#/G# tenon?
« Reply #9 on: December 21, 2023, 08:33:47 AM »
As I understand, the location of the C#/G# is really tough to properly place on a two-piecer. Most clarinets  you see have the tone hole at the extreme lower edge of the upper tenon, sometimes so close to the edge that undercutting isn't even possible.

Obviously, a one-piece body allows tone holes to be placed anywhere necessary for best tone. To literally bridge the gap, the articulated tenon places the C#/G# hole where it WOULD be on a one-piece - which is right at the join between the upper and lower tenons.

Clarinets have been known to explore the most complex methods for solving some simple issues - e.g. McIntyre, Mazzeo, etc.
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages
Virginia Beach, Virginia

Offline Windsong

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Re: Typical articulated C#/G# tenon?
« Reply #10 on: December 25, 2023, 10:06:17 AM »
Interesting observation, Dave.  It is curious that so many manufacturers made clarinets to break down so small, when they are already rather small instruments to begin with, but that has certainly been the tradition.

On that note, I just picked up a very old 7-ring single joint Harry Pedler (in Rosewood) in alarmingly phenominal, fully intact and complete shape from Reverb.  It came to me in a long Getzen case.  It has the all of the adjustment "appliances", and is reminiscent of my earliest Pedlers from the late teens and early 20s. 
I have never seen a one-piece joint from Pedler, and have several brochures of their offerings, without any mention of a single joint. I have also never seen a Rosewood Soprano Pedler.  I wonder if Mr. Pedler may have made this for himself?
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Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Typical articulated C#/G# tenon?
« Reply #11 on: December 25, 2023, 11:07:17 AM »
Ah yes, reminds me of those sopranino recorders that somehow still break down into 3 pieces.
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages
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Offline brigaltman

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Re: Typical articulated C#/G# tenon?
« Reply #12 on: December 25, 2023, 06:05:35 PM »
I'm a doubler who started on saxophone. The articulated G#/C# makes life simpler for those of us who didn't start on clarinet. I love the extra key on the right hand. On the "Grand Duo Concertante" it makes the trill from low C# to D much easier. I've had several instruments with the articulated C#/G# including my current set of full Boehm Leblancs.
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Offline Windsong

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Re: Typical articulated C#/G# tenon?
« Reply #13 on: December 27, 2023, 06:45:48 PM »
Mike,
That certainly makes sense, and you are one of the aforementioned.  I have found that my brain is wired in such a way that less is more.  That said, it is better to have it and not need it than the other way round.  I appreciate you sharing your own preference and displaying its advantage to you.
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Offline brigaltman

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Re: Typical articulated C#/G# tenon?
« Reply #14 on: December 28, 2023, 07:57:31 PM »
I had a Selmer Centertone which had the articulated C#/G#. It had that exact same configuration (the raised square around the tone hole). My Leblancs don't have that raised area.
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