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Author Topic: Typical articulated C#/G# tenon?  (Read 1446 times)

Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: Typical articulated C#/G# tenon?
« Reply #15 on: December 28, 2023, 10:22:52 PM »
Perhaps the raised section is supposed to make it easier to cut the hole, i guess it's easier to measure and cut a square than a circle.
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Offline brigaltman

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Re: Typical articulated C#/G# tenon?
« Reply #16 on: December 29, 2023, 08:31:01 PM »
On the Leblancs I do a complete cork and the very gently open the hole. I think the raised square is to reinforce the tenon joint and the tone hole. However, I've never had a problem with any of the Leblancs that I've had.
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Offline LarryS

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Re: Typical articulated C#/G# tenon?
« Reply #17 on: January 04, 2024, 03:04:15 AM »
I just noticed the trill keys. The upper one is very different!
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Offline brigaltman

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Re: Typical articulated C#/G# tenon?
« Reply #18 on: January 05, 2024, 08:52:35 PM »
the upper one is a rh C#/G#. Thrilling C# to D is really easy when you use that key.
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Offline Windsong

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Re: Typical articulated C#/G# tenon?
« Reply #19 on: January 06, 2024, 07:02:37 PM »
I had a Selmer Centertone which had the articulated C#/G#. It had that exact same configuration (the raised square around the tone hole). My Leblancs don't have that raised area.

I just caught this.  It's interesting to me that Selmer (Paris, I assume) also used the raised square.  It does seem to offer additional strength, but I have concluded that it does something else, as well.  It reduces the wear on the cork around the hole.  The Pedler has joint locks for precise clocking of the tone holes, which I consider almost mandatory for assurance of that precision.
« Last Edit: January 06, 2024, 07:05:06 PM by Windsong »
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