Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
 

Author Topic: Sweet little Salt spoon Eefer  (Read 1854 times)

Offline Windsong

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1415
    • View Profile
Sweet little Salt spoon Eefer
« on: November 16, 2023, 12:55:21 PM »
I received this Eb in the mail a few moments ago, and she plays.  The wood is an exceptional medium-dark grenadilla, and the bell is too, but it has an ostrich grain.
The G/D note pip works just fine.  It is a clumsy thing for me, but there is not much to it.  A lovely artifact, indeed.

I held my breath, hoping it would go unnoticed.  For a very low initial bid, it was mine.
I will need to talk to IC to see what they can do for me, regarding replacement pads.
Expert bubblegum welder, and Pedler Pedler.

Offline Windsong

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1415
    • View Profile
Re: Sweet little Salt spoon Eefer
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2023, 05:32:08 PM »
The tenons had been wrapped with stranded red hair.  I am dearly hoping it is horsehair.     It seemed to be matted together with bitumen, or somesuch.  Once removed, the tenons were all as clean as pins, and unmarred.
The bell is clearly stamped HP E, as is the UJ.  That's all good and well, but this little thing plays to 442HZ on my Korg Chromatic, give or take 10 cents in either direction, and I don't consider that HP.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2023, 08:35:45 AM by Windsong »
Expert bubblegum welder, and Pedler Pedler.

Offline Windsong

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1415
    • View Profile
Re: Sweet little Salt spoon Eefer
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2023, 08:35:02 AM »
This one is a bit of a mystery.  Research concludes that metal posts and flat springs were introduced by Simiot in 1803, and by 1810, they had gained some popularity in clarinets.   The Eb sees its first emergence around the same time--the 1810s.  Precious little can be found on 6 key clarinets, though information on 5 key boxwoods is rather abundant.  Martin Fres. made boxwood 5 keys until 1880, it appears.
I have other ringless clarinets in C, but all are of the 12 key variety. 

The initial tip-off that this is not of early manufacture is the HP stamping on the joint and bell, (despite the fact that it is quite clearly pitched in 442HZ). It occurs to me that stamps may be less important than key work and configuration, as anyone with a die set can add basic pitch stamps.  Also, in place of pins, typically denoting a Czech manufacturer, these posts have actual machined screws, which prominantly points to Bavaria or France, and some others, I assume.
Would anyone like to hazard a guess as to the country, date and possible manufacturer of this horn?
« Last Edit: November 18, 2023, 08:41:29 AM by Windsong »
Expert bubblegum welder, and Pedler Pedler.

Offline modernicus

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 536
    • View Profile
Re: Sweet little Salt spoon Eefer
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2023, 04:13:02 PM »
Anachronistic style clarinet made sometime in the early 20th century?
If you ain't got 'em, that's why you need 'em...

Offline Windsong

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1415
    • View Profile
Re: Sweet little Salt spoon Eefer
« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2023, 06:36:07 PM »
Yes--that certainly seems to be a high likelihood!

And the manufacturer was clever.  The heavy keys are very nice Nic/Sil (but file marks are left on the undersides), and the springs are excellently crafted and very responsive.  This is excellent news, because they would be quite troubling to remanufacture--at least for me.  The post screws are the best I have ever had the pleasure to work with, and the body is exceptional.  If clearly not made of the finest wood, at least they chose well for strength.  (The springs bear directly on wood, and wear is virtually non-existent.  No cracks (yet) at all, and socket rings are present and tight.  There are a couple solid, tiny blemishes, near the top of the LJ--about a third the size of a pea, each, and close to one another. Upon initial inspection, I supposed that it must have been pinned.  However, I see no other indicators of a split, and reckon that there were some surface imperfections that were filled in--due to a "seconds" blank.

In any event, I have decided not to restore her.  She is clean, and just fine as--is.  I have given her a decent cleanse and lube, and someone else can either do the same or better in another 100 years.  She's still drinking on some almond oil, but she's been wiped down, disinfected with orange oil,  (she was filthy, like window decor in a coal pricessing plant).  I have also gently cleaned and disinfected the pads with vinegar, and a quick swipe with isopropyl.  Afterwards, I conditioned the pads with leather lube, in an attempt to preserve them more for historical reference than for playability.

Now I am off to find some Coats and Clark matress thread in crimson, and the elusive replacement thumbrest, and I will call it a day on this little gem.
« Last Edit: November 21, 2023, 09:15:12 PM by Windsong »
Expert bubblegum welder, and Pedler Pedler.

Offline Windsong

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1415
    • View Profile
Re: Sweet little Salt spoon Eefer
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2023, 06:42:47 PM »
And a few more...
« Last Edit: November 21, 2023, 06:44:53 PM by Windsong »
Expert bubblegum welder, and Pedler Pedler.

Offline Windsong

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1415
    • View Profile
Re: Sweet little Salt spoon Eefer
« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2023, 05:07:51 PM »
Well, by gum--I just glimpsed in one of my photos, a stamp that had evaded my notice until just now:
On the barrel, it says France.   It does not say "Made in France", which would have been the new mandatory for all US imports in 1907.  And because it is in English, it was clearly intended for an English speaking market.

This narrows things down a bit, and I can be reasonably well assured it was made prior to 1907.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2023, 05:32:16 PM by Windsong »
Expert bubblegum welder, and Pedler Pedler.

Offline Windsong

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1415
    • View Profile
Re: Sweet little Salt spoon Eefer
« Reply #7 on: November 22, 2023, 05:28:51 PM »
Well, by gum--I just glimpsed in one of my photos, a stamp that had evaded my notice until just now:
On the barrel, it says France.   It does not say "Made in France", which would have been the new mandatory for all US imports in 1907.  Further, because it is in English, it was clearly intended for an English speaking market.
All sections are marked:
 HP
  E
This narrows things down a bit, and I can be reasonably well assured it was made prior to 1907.

The keywork speaks to Couesnon.  Following 432hz, 442hz would have seemed HP, I suppose.  Couesnon were established in 1827, and ran a huge operation.

(No additional photos of barrel and clover thumbrest permitted)
« Last Edit: December 03, 2023, 06:22:39 PM by Windsong »
Expert bubblegum welder, and Pedler Pedler.