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Author Topic: McIntyre Clarinet  (Read 3503 times)

Offline DaveLeBlanc

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McIntyre Clarinet
« on: May 10, 2013, 05:35:57 PM »
Does anybody have any info on this oddball?  I\'m interested in any personal experiences you may have...  I just bought a set of two (one with keys, one missing most) for 150 bucks and im hoping i didnt get jipped out of my money...
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages
Irvine, California, United States

Offline Airflyte

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RE: McIntyre Clarinet
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2013, 07:59:36 PM »
Dave, I\'m afraid that this thread will get the same amount of replies as Phil\'s \"Darog\" mystery clarinet :D

Good luck to you sir :exclamation:
"The Clarinet - in a class of its own"

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https://sites.google.com/clarinetpages.net/clarinetpages

Offline BLMonopole

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RE: McIntyre Clarinet
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2013, 05:54:44 AM »
I was watching those myself and considered buying a McIntyre system.  After some research, I found the following on wikipedia:

McIntyre system [edit]
The McIntyre system was patented in 1959 by Robert and Thomas McIntyre of Naugatuck, Connecticut. They developed a new mechanism for control of the throat notes (A flat, A, and B flat) using only the left hand rings, allowing these notes to be played without the need to move the position of the left hand.[3] There are only three trill keys, rather than the standard Boehm system\'s four, for the right first finger. Otherwise the fingerings are the same as in the standard Boehm system.
The McIntyres produced and sold clarinets using their system, but faced an uphill battle in marketing them. Other than the need for the clarinetist to learn the new throat fingerings, the main drawbacks to the system were the weight and complexity of the mechanism. Lacking funds to work on improvements, the McIntyres tried to interest a major clarinet manufacturer in the system but were unable to reach an agreement, and production of the instrument ceased.

Also, the horns were apparently produced by Thibouville, and had some serious intonation issues.  

Let us know what you discover!

Offline philpedler

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RE: McIntyre Clarinet
« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2013, 05:38:23 AM »
Dave,
I would be very interested to work on and review that clarinet! Sorry I didn\'t respond before!
Thanks for the info, Monopole.
« Last Edit: May 13, 2013, 05:38:50 AM by philpedler »

Offline DaveLeBlanc

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RE: McIntyre Clarinet
« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2013, 06:33:54 PM »
Sure thing, Phil!  ...Though it is missing bell and barrel...  So I\'ll have to find some before I send it to you..
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages
Irvine, California, United States

Offline philpedler

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RE: McIntyre Clarinet
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2013, 06:03:48 AM »
No problem. I have lots of bells and barrels to match with it.

Offline DaveLeBlanc

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RE: McIntyre Clarinet
« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2013, 08:30:41 PM »
Wonderbar!  I\'ll send them over when I get them
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages
Irvine, California, United States

Offline DaveLeBlanc

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RE: McIntyre Clarinet
« Reply #7 on: May 16, 2013, 06:20:28 PM »
Hello all,

   Attached are some pictures and some more information.

The McIntyre clarinet features a normal boehm lower stack, while the upper stack is all different.  The bridge key mechanism works the same, but thats about it.  First off, there are only 3 trill keys.  Also, there is the third ring.  The McIntyre mechanism itself is absurdly complicated.  To get the throat tone A, Bb, Ab, you release the thumb hole, and use one of your three left fingers to press down on a combination of the rings which open up a combination of the four holes up top to get that note.  When the thumb key is pressed down, however, something happens which prevents the four \"McIntyre holes\" to open up.
The mechanism is very heavy, and kind of unwieldy.

Good news:  I will be sending this clarinet to Phil shortly for a massage and a review!  He will provide much better information and better pictures too.
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages
Irvine, California, United States

Offline Rhythmslave

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Re: McIntyre Clarinet
« Reply #8 on: October 25, 2021, 09:24:00 PM »
For fun I picked up a McIntyre "Artiste" wood model for a reasonable price, and was pleasantly surprised to find it in totally playable condition, no pad leaks at all, key chrome still intact. Tenon corks barely functional and will need replacing at some point but something I enjoy doing.  The "only" issue I have with it is the left hand index finger Bb key has considerable play on the ring before the mystery mechanism opens the keypad.  If I am not aggressive on it the note seems to appear when it wants to,  sort of like a sticky pad on a sax...

I decided to acquire a second Artiste to be able to have one to take apart and learn to regulate.  It arrived, missing pads and sluggish keywork due to decades of neglect, just what I needed!  As it turns out the disassembly is pretty simple and straightforward and cleaning and lubricating the long screw rods that hold the bizarre mechanism on the upper joint solved all of the keywork problems on reassembly.  I will add, that the key delay on the Bb carries to this one as well, but I have some ideas on how to deal with it, and once I install new pads I will work on that. 

The playable one is probably an OK intermediate clarinet, holding no candle at all to my Selmer 10S or the Centered Tone.

A total expenditure of $300 bucks for the pair makes this a very good purchase as far as I am concerned.

I'll follow with some pictures at some point.

The confusing part to me is that there are no serial numbers anywhere on either horn.  "Made in France" is stamped on the top front of the upper joints.  The McIntyre System logo stamp on bells, upper joints, and barrel are sharp and still factory gold.  No SNs....  strange.

Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: McIntyre Clarinet
« Reply #9 on: October 26, 2021, 08:24:56 AM »
If you got those McIntyres from a guy in South Carolina, then they were from a large batch of old stock that, to my knowledge, was never sold. At some point after 1958 or whenever McIntyre went bust, somebody bought their entire inventory and dumped them in storage in a South Carolina storage facility. In 2020, a storage wars type of guy managed to buy the storage locker and stumbled upon the gold mind of McIntyres.

They don't have serials because, I suspect, they hadn't made it that far in production.
David Watson of the original The Clarinet Pages
Irvine, California, United States

Offline kewald

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Re: McIntyre Clarinet
« Reply #10 on: October 26, 2021, 04:12:48 PM »
I restored a McIntyre and decided to keep it.  I enjoy playing it and find that I can switch between it and my old B&H Edgware easily if I’ve been playing both recently.
Ken
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