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Author Topic: The original CONN job  (Read 737 times)

Offline Windsong

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The original CONN job
« on: April 01, 2024, 12:40:33 PM »
« Last Edit: April 01, 2024, 12:44:12 PM by Windsong »
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Offline 350 Rocket

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Re: The original CONN job
« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2024, 02:13:56 PM »
I believe this is even older than the seller says - the patent for Conn's double-wall clarinet was granted in 1889. I suppose it's anyone's guess how many they made per year though.

Sometime within the past several months I saw serial number 59 (key of A) listed for sale. (Of course I didn't think to save pictures of it.)
Posted to the original The Clarinet Pages forum from my Power Macintosh 6100/60 using Netscape Navigatorâ„¢

Offline mechanic

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Re: The original CONN job
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2024, 05:17:21 PM »
I'd be pretty worried about that G# key.
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Offline Windsong

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Re: The original CONN job
« Reply #3 on: April 02, 2024, 09:03:32 AM »
Indeed, Rocket.  The early years are nicely sorted into round numbers, and only a neurotic manufacturer would control production with that level of accuracy.  Also, the notion that 1st year production would be 2-4 times the following years' production seems improbable.

Good eye, Mechanic!
Yes--it appears that key got squashed and flattened out a bit!
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Offline Windsong

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Re: The original CONN job
« Reply #4 on: April 02, 2024, 09:16:02 AM »
On the subject of ancient Conns, I stepped away at $160.00 on this beautiful, vintage model.  The seller does not provide a serial, but based upon length, it is a low pitch clarinet.  If this were a Harry Pedler, it would be called a Model 1554--the one Albert of his I STILL do not have. This would have served nicely, since it appears nearly identical, and is likely Pedler's anyway. 

The full Albert System Conn/Pedler clarinets seem to be very rare.  I only see one every 3 or so years.  Good on the person who was more invested than I was:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/186363272699
« Last Edit: April 02, 2024, 09:19:00 AM by Windsong »
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Offline DaveLeBlanc

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Re: The original CONN job
« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2024, 08:05:00 AM »
Nice, I've always wanted a good double wall. Like 10 years ago a pristine example sold from QuinnTheEskimo on ebay for I think it was around $300, which was the literal deal of a lifetime. Missed out, of course. Very sad.
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Offline 350 Rocket

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Re: The original CONN job
« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2024, 02:04:09 PM »
Indeed, Rocket.  The early years are nicely sorted into round numbers, and only a neurotic manufacturer would control production with that level of accuracy.  Also, the notion that 1st year production would be 2-4 times the following years' production seems improbable.
Beyond that, I've seen it suggested that Conn clarinet and saxophone serial numbers were separate at first, with the sequences merged later. I believe that to be the case, but I need more data to be confident.
Posted to the original The Clarinet Pages forum from my Power Macintosh 6100/60 using Netscape Navigatorâ„¢